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AUTHENTIC BOOKS OF THE MARTIAL ARTS 



WHAT IS KARATE? 
by M. Oyama 

New Edition! A valuable book on Karate by 
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this violent yet restrained art and sport. 
144 pages with over 700 photographs. 10 pages 
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THE WAY OF KARATE 
by E. Mattson 

Explains the Okinawan style of Karate with 
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KARATE — The Art of "Empty Hand" Fighting 
by H. Nishiyama and R. Brown 

A complete and fully illustrated manual giving 
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SECRETS OF CHINESE KARATE 
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A leading Karate instructor reveals the amaz- 
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KENPO KARATE by E. Parker 

This is an earlier book written by E. Parker, 
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THIS IS KARATE 
by M. Oyama 

Coming soon! New book written by the author of "What is Karate?" 
Approx. 320 pages with more than 4000 photos in Black and White. 

Expected in June 1964 Tentative $13.50 



SECRET FIGHTING ARTS OF THE WORLD 
by Gilbey $3.75 

PRACTICAL KARATE, FUNDAMENTALS 
by Nakayama and F. Draeger $2.95 



THE SPORT OF JUDO 
by K. Kobayashi and H. E. Sharp 

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350 photographs giving step by step Judo 
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KODOKAN JUDO — A GUIDE TO PROFICIENCY 
edited by Y. Matsumoto, T. Kawamura, 
T. Daigo and Y. Ozawa 

Introductory course in Judo for the beginner 
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JUDO 



THE TECHNIQUES OF JUDO 
by S. Takagaki and H. E. Sharp 

A fully illustrated and authoritative manual 
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143 pages with more than 550 
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A COMPLETE GUIDE TO JUDO 
by R. W. Smith 

An anthology containing some of the long-out- 
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This volume also contains articles on the 
cognate Arts of Aikido and Karate. 69 plates 
including illustrations of technical sequences. 
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THE MECHANICS OF JUDO 
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THE SECRETS OF JUDO 

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major wazas. Over 250 photographs and drawings. $3.95 



CANON OF JUDO 
by K. Mifune 

The author, the forest most authority of Judo in Japan, tells of the 
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written for the laymen and the initiated. 250 pages with 1000 photos. 
7*4 x 10*4 $11.00 



AIKIDO 
by K. Tohei 

One of the earliest books on Aikido explaining 
and instructing the Art which was kept secret 
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WHAT IS AIKIDO? 
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JUDO AND AIKIDO 
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ILLUSTRATED KOOOKAN JUDO 
edited by Kodokan 

The present work will, not only serve as a 
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A GUIDE TO JUDO 
Grappling Techniques by T. Ohashi 

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THE HANDBOOK OF JUDO 
by G. LeBell and L Coughran 

This book is as valuable for the finalist as 
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186 pages, 5" x 8", 380 photos $3.95 
Paperback version of same book $1.00 

JUDO TRAINING METHODS 
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Includes training methods and over 200 
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routines, and sensible weight training for Judo. 
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326 pages, 7'/ 4 " x 10>/ 2 " Approximately, 
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EDITORIAL 



ARE WE PREJUDICED? 

Since the publication of Black Belt Magazine, 
we have been witnessing a tremendous growth in the 
Oriental's self-defense sports and arts . . . growth in 
the number of participants, expansion of the vari- 
ous organizations, more publicity, and bigger and 
more tournaments held. Kendo, once a well-known 
art in U.S., is attempting a comeback, Jujutsu, al- 
most extinct after the War, is trying to re-establish. 
Aikido, newest and least known, is slowly gaining 
recognition. Judo, the major self-defense sport, did 
receive an impetus when it was initiated into the 
1964 Olympic. But its failure to be reinstataed in 
1968 may affect its expansion, especially among 
the high schools and colleges. Karate, the most 
spectacular art to the American, is on a 'blistering 
pace' to catch-up to Judo. 

What's the reason for Karate's phenomenal 
growth? Is it easier to learn? Is it better organized? 

We do not think that Karate is easier to learn. 
But we do realize its similarity to boxing than any 
other art. To learn Karate one must put just as 
much efforts as the others. Each kick or punch 
must be practiced over and over again to develop 
accuracy, speed, and power. Many beginners give 
up because they cannot keep up with the physical 
conditioning exercises. 

We believe that the Karate organizations in U.S. 
are the least organized. Although the art is con- 
sidered to be one of the oldest, its introduction 



here is only recent. But within this short span 
there are at least six different types of Karate (or 
arts similar in nature) . . . Kempo, Gung Fu, Oki- 
nawa Te, Kong So, etc. To organize all these schools 
into one great unit seems impossible because all of 
them have their own standard katas (forms). But 
it can be done. In Hawaii there are just as many 
types of Karate, but all of them are affiliated un- 
der one controlling body, called the Hawaii Karate 
Congress. We hope someday this Congress can be 
expanded to include every Karate organization in 
the U.S. 

We feel that Karate has enjoyed a phenomenal 
growth in U.S. because of the leaders behind the 
art. We find them more aggressive, more coopera- 
tive, and more understanding. Many criticize Black 
Belt for favoring Karate or for favoring one or- 
ganization over the others. They complain that we 
have published more Karate articles than the other 
arts. 

The staff of Black Belt attempts to be impartial 
and attempts to give equal coverage to all the arts. 
But sometimes this is impossible. A large number 
of our articles published in the past is submitted 
by free-lance writers. More than one-half was on 
Karate. 

We of Black Belt will continue to carry-on its 
unbiased policy. And we hope to hear less com- 
plaints and more cooperation from all the organi- 
zations. 



4 



publisher, M. UYEHARA 
editor, GEORGE ASAWA 

MANAGING EDITOR, LOU KIMZEY 
PRODUCTION MANAGER, BOB KIMZEY 
FAR EAST EDITOR, 

DR. GORDAN WARNER 
EAST COAST EDITOR, ROBERT WELLS 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS, BILL EVANS. 

DR. WILLIAM C. C. HU 
DICK DIMON, DR. P. J. RASCH 

TECHNICAL ADVISORS, 

TOKUJI HIRATA, TORAO MORI, 
HIDETAKA NISHIYAMA, 
EDMUND PARKER, H. E. SHARP, 
ISAO TAKAHASHI, 
KOICHI TOHEI, BEN TSUJI 

AIR FORCE LIAISON OFFICER, 

MAJORJOHN GREGORY 

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR, 

EDMUND JUNG 

PHOTOGRAPHY, RALPH POOLE 
ART DIRECTOR, HIDEO SEI 
CARTOON EDITOR, D. F. ENSLOW 
CONTRIBUTING CARTOONIST, 

BILL PICKWELL 




Black Belt is published bi-monthly by 
the Black Belt, Inc., 1288 So. La Brea 
Aye., Los Angeles 19, California. Ap- 
plication to mail at second class rates 
pending at Los Angeles, California and 
at additional mailing offices. Copyright 
1963 by Black Belt, Inc. Subscription 
Rates: $3.00 for six issues in the 
United States. $6.00 for six issues in 
all foreign countries. Single copy price 
$.50. The publishers and editors will 
not be responsible for unsolicited ma- 
terial. Manuscripts and photographs to 
be accompanied by a stamped, self- 
addressed return envelope. 
Printed in U.S.A. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS — Send old 
address as well as new address (60 
days before moving to get continuous 
service) to: 

Black Belt, Inc. 
1288 So. La Brea Ave. 
Los Angeles 19, California 

Do not depend on the post office to 
forward magazines; they are not for- 
warded unless you pay extra postage. 



BLACK BELT 



VOLUME TWO 




NUMBER TWO 



CONTENTS 



Kendo: The Art of Japanese Fencing. . . 


. . . . 0 
.... 8 




....14 


2nd East Coast Karate Tournament 


. . . .18 


CAPOEIRA, Brazilians Karate 


. . . .22 


Promotion List 


...25 


Dojo Bulletin Board 


....26 


Aikido- Basic Techniques 


....30 


TANO SOO DO at March AFB 


. ...32 


How To Enjoy A Samurai Movie 


....37 


Meditation Tn Atkido 


. . ..41 


How To Do It: Karate 


. . . .44 


Fencing Masters Of Japan 


. . . .46 


Tournament Results 


....49 


North American Judo 


....50 


Rlack Belt Directory 


....55 


Book Of The Month 


....56 


Black Belt Roundtable 


....57 


18 Martial Arts Of Japan 


60 





5 



LETTERS 



TO THE 



CHARACTER SOUDIFIERS 

Dear Sirs: 

I enjoy your magazine very much. 
It has helped me keep in touch with 
Judo, even though our Muskogee- 
YMCA Judo Club has been discon- 
tinued. 

I am very deeply interested in 
Judo, Aikido and Karate, not only as 
weapons, but also as "character so- 
lidifies". I was very pleased with the 
inner quietude and self confidence I 
acquired during my brief exposure. 

I do not think another club will 
be established here in Muskogee, so 
I am asking you for information 
about dojos sponsored by colleges. I 
have decided not to enter a college 
unless it does have a dojo. Do you 
have a list (or know where I might 
find one) of colleges in the midwest 
which sponsor Judo programs? 
Thank you, 
Gene Ray 

Muskogee, Oklahoma 
(Judo tournaments among colleges 
are on the increase, black belt has 
covered such meets in past issues. 
Kansas State University at Manhat- 
tan is but one of the many schools 
to have a strong Judo club. It is 
recommended that after a college is 
selected, an inquiry be forwarded to 
its Physical Ed Dept. Ed.) 

# * * 

A LUCKY HUBBY 

We purchased one copy of your 
magazine black belt and since then 
have been unable to obtain anymore 
anywhere in Fairbanks, Alaska. 

My husband is a 1st Degree (Sho- 
dan), and it would give me great 
pleasure to send this to him as a 
surprise (tho' we live in the same 
house). It's so hard to keep a nice 
secret from such a wonderful person. 
Our 14 year old son is just beginning 
and as soon as our new baby is a 
few mo's old I shall start my train- 
ing also. 

Please let me know-airmail if you 
are printing your magazine still, and 
if so I will send a check for 1 year 
with my husband's name, etc. 

Mrs. Clarence H. Boyesson 
Alaska 



TOO WONDERFUL TO MISS 

I am a 14 year old student of 
Shotokan Karate, and in adolescence, 
I find the art an inspire of confidence 
and poise. It could be due to my 
youth, (but I really should give more 
credit to the art itself) but I find 
myself soaking up all of the infor- 
mation and news about Karate that 
is available to me. Then I discovered 
your magazine. My greatest interest 
remains Karate, but you made such 
an all-around wonderful magazine 
that I now read about all the martial 
arts with great interest. I save all 
of the "Black Belts" that I have 
bought. Suddenly "Black Belts" 
ceased to circulate in my area I kept 
thinking that it was only a momen- 
tary lapse in production. Then my 
instructor tells me that he got it in 
the mail. I thought of all the things 
that I had missed, (tournament 
news, articles, good grief!) and I 
would have kicked myself if it was 
possible. Before another day passed 
I sent the subscription money. ($3.00 
enclosed) I've learned my lesson, 
and now I'm sitting on pins and 
needles, waiting for the magazine to 
arrive. Your magazine is too wonder- 
ful to be missed for one issue. Keep 
up the terrific work! 

David Applewhite 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
* •» * 



A WARM RESPONSE FROM 
A SHERIFF 

I would like to offer the thanks of 
the entire Sheriff's Department for 
your excellent article, "Watchdog 
for a Giant," in the current issue of 
Black Belt Magazine. 

I enjoyed the article tremendously. 
So often stories about organizations 
such as ours tend to be extracts of 
statistical data, lacking interest and 
punch. But your fresh and stimulat- 
ing approach gave it interest and 
impact. 

My kindest regards and every best 
wish for continued success. 

Peter J. Pitchess 
Sheriff 

Los Angeles 12, Calif. 



A DISAPPOINTED JUDOIST 

I am disappointed in black BELT. 
There should be more issues avail- 
able and on time. 

I am 18 years old, a 2nd Class 
(Nikyu) Brown Belt in Judo and 
in the best of health. I am mention- 
ing this because if I ever go to Cali- 
fornia, I will engage all the editors 
and your technical advisors in a 
free-for-all randori or else make you 
fellows write at least more issues. 

Morton Goldstein 
Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 

(Who-o-a-a, Morton. With all that 
energy you'll probably make 10th 
Degree. We are remedying our short- 
comings. Thank you for your pa- 
tiences. We hope to make black belt 
one of top magazine in the field of 
martial arts with our subscribers' 
help. Ed.) 

* * * 



A JUDOIST NEED MONEY 
FOR A MOVIE 

Your writer is a student of Judo 
and also has a full working knowl- 
edge of motion picture production. 
I am interested in producing a mo- 
tion picture feature film for theatre 
release. The theme of which will 
involve Judo along with Christian 
emphasis. 

The reason for this letter is to ask 
if you would publish this letter in 
hope that it will bring me in contact 
with someone of large means, such 
as a Philantropist, who will sponsor 
the film. Locals in my city would 
make some investments. One Hun- 
dred Thousand Dollars ($100,000) 
would be needed from the sponsor 
and the movie company. This is not 
a stock offering and could not be 
under Federal Laws and Regulations. 
However, if there be a Philantropist 
who could consider this loan, I will 
be glad to supply full details. There 
is chance of very good profit from 
the picture but, of course, the mo- 
tion picture industry does involve 
great deal of speculation. 

C. Kennon Robertson 
Spartanburg, S.C. 



6 



EDITORS 



CINDER BLOCK POUNDERS 

Please send me the first issue of 
black belt Magazine for which I 
enclose $1.00. Since you are out of 
issue number two, could you please 
send me the editorial from that 
issue? 

In the book "Zen Combat," by Jay 
Gluck, there is a statement that says, 
"Pounding the fist against a cinder 
block for 'toughening' is not karate 
and is denounced by Oriental Karate 
masters." Is this true? 

Would it be possible to get the 
autographs of all the judo-kas and 
karate-kas on your staff such as 
Hidetaka Nishiyama, Ed Parker, H. 
E. Sharp, etc. ? I am collecting auto- 
graphs of all the famous judo-kas 
and karate-kas. I would appreciate 
this favor very much. 

You have a truly great magazine 
and I hope you keep up the good 
work. 

A faithful reader, 
Larry Bombardier 
Albany 10, New York 
(There are many styles of Karate; 
therefore different methods of train- 
ing. Many styles resort to various 
means to toughen their hands, e.g., 
pounding a punching board, into a 
bucket of sand or pebbles, or a cinder 
block. There are styles or schools 
that deplore such training practices; 
they do very little toward toughen- 
ing hands. Ed.) 

* * •» 

MORE ON OKAZAKI 

I was reading in the summer issue 
of BLACK BELT where Henry Okazaki 
defeated a heavyweight boxer, K. 0. 
Morris, who said that he had de- 
feated all Judo and Ju-Jitsu experts. 
I also read in "The King Wrestling" 
where Sam McVey defeated a champ 
by the name of Tano Matsuda in 10 
seconds. Also that . Packy O'Gatty 
defeated Shimakada, a Judo expert, 
who outweighed him by 75 pounds 
in four seconds. Does all of this 
prove that boxing is superior to 
Judo? How about a story comparing 
the two? I'm sure many of the read- 
ers would enjoy such a story. 

Lawrence Nance 
Detroit, Mich. 

Continued on Page 54 



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Copyrighted material 



by Dr. Gordan Warner 




Dr. Gordon Warner, Professor of Education, Long 
Beach State College and Western Consultant for 
the Tanaka Educational Research Institute, Tokyo, 
Japan, has just returned from a year's sabbatical 
leave in Japan. A retired Lt. Col. of the Marines, 
he was awarded the Navy Cross for heroism in 
WW II and raised the first American flag on the 
Island of Bougainville, Solomon Islands. 
Dr. Warner began his study of the martial arts 
when he entered the Kodansha Publishing Com- 
pany Do jo in Tokyo in 1937. Master Moriji Mo- 
chida, 10th Degree (Judan), was the head of the 
dojo and is presently the National Treasurer of 
Japan. 

Dr. Warner, who joined our staff as one of the 1st 
editors of the black belt, is the highest ranking 
non-Japanese in Kendo receiving his 6th Degree 
(Rokudan) during the 1962 All-Japan Kendo Fed- 
eration Annual examination in Fukuoka City, Kyu- 
shu, Japan. He also holds a 3rd Degree (Sandan) 
in Iai (Yamato Ryu) and he has taken his exami- 
nation in Eishin Hasegawa Ryu. 



KENDO: 
THE ART OF 
JAPANESE 

FENCING 





Inside the old Kodokan, Tokyo (Judo Hqs.) where in- Sunday morning training sessions. Kendoist (I) has 
structors from various dojos used to meet for early assumed a Left Stance (Hidari JodanJ as he advances. 




From a way of violence and a need for self- 
preservation . . . the way of the sword . . . 
developed a code of ethics which was to 
have a profound influence upon an entire 
nation. 



The long wait was swiftly approaching its cli- 
max. Both swordsmen, unafraid, knew that the 
inevitable end was near. 

They had fought long and savagely. The sands of 
Ganryuzima showed evidence of this great struggle. 
The swordsmen had fought mustering all their skill 
and every tactics acquired through years of self- 
denial and hard training. The lives of men who had 
fallen before their swords had paved a bloody path 
for this last and fateful encounter. 

A slight chilling breeze blowing in from the 
Strait of Kanmon went unnoticed as perspiration 
dampened the foreheads of both men. 

At the water's edge the boatman who had fer- 
ried Musashi Miyamoto to this lonely island ner- 
vously awaited the outcome. Little did he realize 
that he was to witness one of the greatest display 
of swordsmanship in the history of Japan. While 
on a knoll overlooking the beach Kojiro Sasaki's 
lord and retainers grimly waited and watched the 
duel. A mortal duel to determine who was the 
greatest swordsman of Japan. 

As Musashi raised his bokken (wooden sword) 
which he had fashioned out of an oar, Kojiro saw 
his opening. With a smile of confidence he lowered 
his sword for his famed "Tsubamegaeshi" (the 
Swallow Stroke) from which there was no escape. 

Kojiro's sword flashed with blinding speed. Mu- 
sashi leaped to unbelievable height and landed with 
two swords extended in the Niten Style. A smile 
flickered across the face of Kojiro as he saw the 



9 

Copyrighted materia 




\ 



Kendo kata irith a bakkrn «* demonxtrttted by Master 
Shotaro Xemoto, Hthe Drgnr iHachidan) in Kendo 
and lai. Use of Hitch mnpvfi duriny training reunited 
in many casualties among students; this led to the 
development of the shinai. 




Students lined up for ealisthi nirs brforr training ses- 
sions. Note the head toircls d raped over protective 
equipment and fencing shinai lined in the foreground. 



severed headband and blood oozing from Musashi's 
forehead. 

Both swordsmen stood, immovable, facing one 
another as if suspended in time and space for a 
brief period of immortality. The smile frozed on 
Kojiro's face as he slowly pitched forward upon 
the disturbed sands. 

The way of the sword, Kendo, has its origin 
embedded in the antiquities of Japanese history. 
The weapon of survival with its multitudes of 
styles as perfected by the Japanese samurai (war- 
riors) such as Musashi and Kojiro has left its 
impact and evolved into one of the most interesting 
and fastest action sports in modern times. The 
word "Kendo" when written in Kanji (Chinese 
form of writing adopted by the Japanese in the 
5th Century) is made up of two ideograms: 
(ken, meaning the sword) and (do, the way 

or philosophy). 

Most Japanese historians are in agreement on 
many aspects of Kendo as contained in the Kojiki 
(Stories of Ancient Japan) which covers the period 
of Japanese history from mythological ages to the 
reign of Emperor Suiko (593-628) and in Nihon- 
shoki (720 A.D.) pertaining to period up to the 
reign of Emperor Jito (686-697). It is generally 
conceded that Iyenao Yamashironokame Iishino 
(known later as Choisai Iishino) opened one of the 
first schools of fencing. It was called the Shinto 
Ryu. 

The development of Kendo from a crude form 
of combat began some 1600 years ago. The use of 
a solid wooden sword (bokken) and the establish- 
ment of the art of Tachikaki (the attack or the 
drawing' of sword technique) is recorded about 
400 A.D. Kendo developed to one of individual art 
of swordsmanship during the Taika Restoration 
(646 A.D.) This form continued until the later 
part of the Heian Period (794 to 1191 A.D.). 

In order to comprehend the evolution of Kendo, 
one must study the rise to power of the samurai, 
the warrior-knights of Japan. The rise of the 
samurai class in 1067 A.D. herald the beginning 
of various styles or schools (ryu's) in sword tech- 
niques. 

Before the Heian Period the samurai wore his 
sword suspended from sash-like belt (obi) by two 
strings with the cutting edge of the blade toward 
the ground. However, at the turn of the 10th cen- 
tury the long sword was worn on the left side by 
tucking it through the obi with the cutting edge 
upward. This facilitated a "quick draw" in which 
the sword was withdrawn with cutting edge toward 
the enemy with minimum effort. It was not until 
later that a short sword was worn tucked in the 
obi with the long sword. 

During the Nara Era (650-793 A.D.) Tachikaki 
was replaced by a new form of combat, the 
Tachiuchi (duel). This form was comparable to 
the European combat-of-arms. The various styles 
of fencing underwent a slow transition for many 



10 



iterial 



years but began to exert itself during the latter 
part of the Heian Era to the Kamakura Period 
(1192 to 1336 A.D.) 

The rise of the samurai into the Japanese his- 
torical picture developed slowly; it began soon 
after the capitol was moved from Nara to Kyoto 
(794 A.D.). As the defects in the system of the 
centralized government began to assert themselves, 
discords with the rural administration began to 
plague the central authorities. As the land owners 
in rural communities were forced to maintain 
armed forces to insure the safety of their posses- 
sions, the groundwork for the entrance of the 
samurai was laid. 

The samurai, who arose from families of influen- 
tial persons, local chieftians, or servants of govern- 
ment officials or nobles, began to exert a greater 
influence in the rural estates of the noblemen. The 
aristocrats now enjoying the peace and ease of 
metropolitan life in Kyoto, the new capitol, were 
indifferent and failed to remedy this dangerous 
trend. The class who was to gain power in the fol- 
lowing periods arose from those who had served 
the aristocracy during the peaceful Nara and Heian 
periods . . . the samurai. 

However, it was during this transition that the 
art of Kendo developed. Opportunities offered to 
master swordsman spurred samurai to seek skillful 
Kendo teachers in order to perfect their fencing or 
sword techniques. As a master swordsman a samu- 
rai could set up a fencing school subsidized by a 
lord of a clan. 

For the next 200 years and until the Ashikaga 
Era (1337 - 1573 A.D.) the art of fencing under- 
went very little change. However, during Ashikaga 
Era many fencing schools flourished and the popu- 
larity of Kendo was, again, on the rise. Fencing 
schools (dojos) founded by exceptionally strong 
and skillful swordsmen produced various styles of 
Kendo. The most famous of these were the fencing 
schools of Nagahide Chujo (1380), Bunguro Hu- 
kida (1437), Choisai Iizasa (1488) and In-Ei 
(1521), a renown spearman as well as a swords- 
man. 

During practices zealous students with desire to 
display their skill before his teacher would be 
carried away with such enthusiasm that he would 
challenge anyone in the gym. Such actions often 
led to serious injuries and in some cases . . . death. 

Contests where contacts were made, i.e., with a 
wooden sword (bokken), etc., distressed the famed 
Iko Aisu (1452-1538 A.D.). During his meditations 
at Udo Shrine in Miyazaki Prefecture, the inspired 
Aisu devised a new method of defense techniques. 
His school, established in 1488 and called the Aisu- 
Kuge School of Swordsmanship, was to have a 
profound influence on the Yagyu Clan, the most 
distinguished swordsmen of the later years. 

During the later part of the Ashikaga Era, 
Kendo as a martial art stagnated. However, during 
this period Kata-kenjitsu (where two fencers faced 




.4 defense against a blow to the MEN (head). This 
early morning practice is being conducted on the shore 
of Shimoda Bay. It a-as here that the 1st American 
envoy to Japan, Toirnnend Harris, landed. 




Attack points are scored daring a match between the 
visting masters from Japan. 




Age is not a deterrent to part iripation in Kendo. The 
boy above practices with his instructor at this #•< Uuion 
dojo in Prefecture of Mito, Japan. 



11 

Copyrighted material 



TSUKA 



1 



TSUBA 
I 



TSURU 



NAKAU\ 



5AK\GAWA 



Shinai (fencing stave made of bamboo strips) 




Tare (waist band) 





Do ( chest armor) 



Kote (Wrist guard or gauntlet) 




The Main Attack Points of Kendo 



one another and practiced with a wooden sword) 
was developed. Stress was placed upon form and 
motion ; personal contact was restricted. The Kata- 
kenjitsu techniques required skill and the master- 
ing of many movements with little thought given 
to realistic value of contact. 

The interest in action and actual contact with 
wooden sword was renewed during the Nobunaga 
(1568-1582 A.D.) and the Hideyoshi (1582-1598 
A.D.) periods. This, again, resulted in serious in- 
juries and even deaths to the participants during 
practice sessions. 

In order to minimize serious injuries among 
fencers during practice matches, Chuzo Nakanishi 
(1750) of Edo (as Tokyo was called in ancient 
times) invented a stave (shinai) made with four 
sections of bamboo. Each section was fitted so all 
dangerous edges and splinters were eliminated. 
This original shinai was to undergo very little 
change and is basically similar to the fencing shinai 
of today. 

Even with the introduction of this shinai, Naka- 
nishi required all students to wear protective equip- 
ment. Rules and regulation on fencing etiquette 
were established. The style of Kata-kenjitsu was 
replaced by Kenjutsu or Kengaki (sword action). 

The fencing skirt (hakama) and a heavy jacket 
(kekogei) was adopted as the standard wearing 
apparel. The first protective equipment to be worn 
outside of the hakama was the waist band (tare) 
which fits snugly around the waist to protect the 
hips from any blow which might miss the center 
protective armor. The tare has five pendants hang- 
ing down about 12 inches in length. 

Next the chest armor (do . . . pronounced as 
dough) was worn for the protection of the chest. 
The do was held in place by crossing the cords at 
the back and tying ends to the loops on each side 
of the armor at the front. A cord at the base of the 
do prevents the armor from sliding forward. 

Later the face and head protector (men) was 
devised so that additional action could be added to 
Kendo. Before a fencer places the men on his head 
he generally wraps a towel over his head to prevent 
perspiration from running into his eyes. 

The next protective equipment developed was the 
wrist guard (Kote). A decisive blow was considered 
to be to the right wrist since the right hand holds 
the sword. The kote with its padded cotton rein- 
forcing was designed to protect the joints against 
the powerful blows struck at the wrist. 

After a kendoist has secured his equipment he 



12 



must stand, place his shinai in his left hand and 
bow as he enters the training gym. If there is an 
opponent who wish to fence with him, both must 
face the head instructor and present themselves 
with a slight bow. When both participants are 
ready, they must face each other, acknowledging 
with another slight bow. They must take six steps 
directly toward each other, then together in unison, 
slowly lower to a squatting position while drawing 
the fencing shinai in front. When the contestants 
rise together or at a command, the match is on. 
This procedure must be repeated after each prac- 
tice session and as in ancient times, it is still a 
standard procedure practiced in the fencing schools 
throughout the world. 

Various point systems were developed for the 
sport of Kendo; they are as follows: Kote (wrist), 
Men (Migi-Men, right side of head; Men, top of 
head; and Hidari-Men, left side of head), Do 
(waist), and the Tsuki (throat). Each strike or 
cut must be called out at the same time that they 
are made. In other words, as the kendoist strikes 
the opponent, he must instantaneously call out the 
point as he hits. This not only developes the physi- 
cal but full mental coordination. 

The ready stance (Kamae) is extremely im- 
portant to master in Kendo. It is from this basic 
position that all movements originate. When the 
Kamae of a kendoist is so perfect, it is almost im- 
possible to find an opening. There are instances 
when a match of three points ends without a point 
being scored because of the skill of an opponent. 

Chudan Kamae, one of the basic position or 
stance, must be mastered first. Foot work is vital 
in Kendo. The right foot is always forward with 
the left foot in a heel-up propelling position. The 
right foot and the right hand always lead together. 

The stave (shinai) is held by the right hand at 
a point one to two inches from the guard (tsuba) . 
The left hand firmly grasps the end of the shinai 

(Continued on page 64) 



Kendoist with his fencing shinai and protective equip- 
ment; the equipment is worn over the hakama (shirt) 
and Kekogei (jacket). The head toivel lying in the 
foreground is wrapped around the forehead before the 
head protector is worn. 




Copyrighted material 



CO 



'A 




"It's Amazing The Effect Judo Has Both Physically and Psychologically . . . 

Genera/ Curtis E. LeMay 



At March Air Force Base, S Sgt. Leonard M. Shull has 
taken unusual interest in the junior group. He received his 
instructor training in Japan in 1959 and I960. He is 
Fifteenth Air Force champion in the 1 60$ division. He 
holds classes weekly with some 20 boys, ages 8 to 15, sons 
of military personnel stationed at March. Shulls boys are 
undefeated in Southern California competition in the past 
three years. October 7 at Riverside, the team defeated 
Riverside in seven out of nine events. 

SAC regularly sends personnel to Tokyo for instructor 
training. Following SAC's lead, the art of Judo greatly 
expanded in the United States as a competitive sport. 
SAC and other military organizations hold annual compe- 
titions. 



The AAU has ratings. The present holders of the AAU 
heavyweight and I60# championships are in Fifteenth 
Air Force. Heavyweight champion (past three years) is 
S/Sgt. George Harris, 5th Bomb Wing, Travis AFB, Calif. 
The I60# AAU Champion (past two years) is Toshiyuki 
Seino, A./2C at Davis-Monthan AFB in Arizona. 

Judo is emphasized now by the USAF, which supports 
competition, through USAF Judo Association located at 
Offutt AFB, Nebr. 

Participants are encouraged to affiliate with the US 
monitoring group styled Nanka Judo Association in Los 
Angeles. Through supervision they insure that only certified 
instructors using proper facilities are listed. The sport thus 
watches out for safety and proper development of skills. 



14 




X 



Doing like their daddies do, Scott Brown (on top) and 
Bryan Emert compete in the Junior Judo Competition 
held at Barksdale AFB, La., last July. One of the by- 
products of SAC's Judo expansion has been the partici- 
pation of dependents, regardless of age or sex, in this 
healthy sport. 






Typical group of Junior Judo pupils of SSgt. Leonard 
M. Shull at March Air Force Base, Calif oi-nia. (I to r, 
standing) Mike Paluzzill, David Harris 13, Mike Soccio 
14, Jim Weatherall 15, SSgt. Skull, instructor, Bob 
Johnson 14, Lawrence Cole 13, Larry Bryan 12, Allen 
Freeman 13. (I to r, kneeling rear row) Jay Kaseman 
12, Lance Lewis 9, John Bouiey Jr. 10, James Gallagher 
Jr. 0, Robert Babcock 8. (I to r, kneeling front row) Jeff 
Kaseman 12, Tim Kaseman 8, John Riddle 8. (Note: 
Jay and Jeff Kaseman are twins). 






Junior judoists at MacDill AFB, Fla., demonstrate 
Ukemi for their "civilian" buddies from Orlando, Fla. 
The youngsters, all dependents of SAC airmen, are 
taught the basic techniques of the sport by base Judo 
experts during evening classes. 



In commenting on the importance of the marital 
arts, Gen. LeMay said: 

"This Judo idea started out in my SAC days 
when we found the crews needed something to 
unwind them after 36 tense hours of flying. 

"So I introduced Judo as a relaxer. I've got a 
Back Belt, but I think it's mostly honorary. I 
wouldn't like to tangle with a real Black Belter. 

"It's amazing the effect Judo has both physi- 
cally and psychologically. It's a tremendous builder 
of self-confidence. And you can get just as much 
exercise as you want." 



During practice by Junior Judo pupils at March Air 
Force Base, 8-year old Tim Kaseman throws 15-year 
old Jim Weatherall. 




HOW TO DO IT; 

JUDO 

Okuri Ashi Harai ( Follow Foot Sweep) 




Fig. L Hold opponent's gi near his right elbow 
with your left hand. With your right hand grab 
opponent's lapel by his left shoulder. 




Fig. 2. As opponent steps sideways with his 
left foot, you follow suit with your right foot. 




Fig. 3. After your opponent has stepped side- 
ways with his left foot, he's natural reaction is 
to step likewise with his right foot. At this 
point you must sweep his right foot towards 
his left, sweeping both feet from under him. 
Simultaneously pull his right elbow in and lift 
his right shoulder up. 




Fig. 4. As his feet leave the mat, turn his body 
like a large wheel with your arms. 




Fig. 1. Drag your left foot close and slightly 
to the outside of the opponent's right foot and 
keep your knee slightly bended. Break his pos- 
ture by pulling his right elbow downward and 
toward you, and by pushing his neck with your 
right arm. 




Fig. 2. As his posture is broken, move quickly 
with your right hip and leg forward. 



HOW TO DO IT: 




O Soto Gari (Major Outer Reap) 




Fig. 3. Throw him by sweeping his right leg 
forward with the back of your right leg. 




Fig. 4. As you sweep your leg, drive your 
head toward the mat and lift your leg up until 
you're in a straight line. 



17 

Copyrights* 



The Former Weight-lifter Moved Through His Opponents 
With Precision, But He Was Not Able To Mow Them Down. 



2nd EAST COAST 

KARATE 



CHAMPIONSHIPS 








By Bob Wells 

Photography by John Gregory 

More than 3,000 New Yorkers packed the 
Manhattan Center on October 13th to see Black 
Belter Jules Paulin of the Philadelphia Karate 
Club retain his East Coast Karate champion- 
ship. The 27-year-old Paulin, three-time Penn- 
sylvania State champ and last year's champion 
of the All-America Karate Federation, will rep- 
resent the east coast at the Ail-American cham- 
pionship in San Francicso later this year. 

The former weight-lifter moved through his 
oponents with precision, but he was not able to 
mow them down as he had when he won the 
East Coast title last year. The opposition was 
tough and determined — and too good — for 
anyone to breeze through to the top. 

Besides — it was not revealed until after the 
tournament — Paulin had entered the competi- 
tion with a local anesthetic numbing the pain 
of a chronic slipped disc; however, as the semi- 
final matches began the drug wore off. The 
champion with pain in his back fought the 
toughest matches of the day with only a slight 
stiffness. 

The tournament had been widely advertised 
and the crowd was a regular big city sports 
crowd rather than the customary small band 
of afncionados. For many it was their first 
glimpse of Karate and they responded with en- 
thusiasm and pleasure. When Master Hidetaka 
Nishiyama from the west coast, and later Mas- 
ter Teruyuki Okazaki of the Philadelphia Ka- 
rate Club, demonstrated self-defense techniques 
against knives and surprise attacks, the crowd 
gave them wild, standing ovations, and kept up 
the applause until they got encores. As Master 
Nishiyama performed his favorite kata, Unsu, 
and as Master Okazaki and Hiroshi Orito per- 
formed their favorite katas, the crowd "Aaahed" 
in appreciation and broke into spontaneous clap- 
ping. Though many had never seeen anything 
like them, they responded to the katas of the 
masters as things of beauty. Master Nishiyama 
in particular seemed surprised and affected by 
the clamorous applause for his self-defense dem- 
onstration, and when he was finally prevailed on 
for an encore his kata was full of an intensity, 
a slow rhythm and a deadly grace that raised 
his martial "art" to a real art of expression. 



The quality of the contestants' forms had 
noticably improved since last year and the tech- 
nique they displayed was some of the best yet 
seen in this part of the country. The freestyle 
fighting (Kumite) during the tournament was 
fast and agressive without becoming clumsy. The 
referees and judges were hard to please, and 
when the points were scored they were clean and 
decisive. 

The forms demonstrated in the kata competi- 
tion were in almost every case sharp, graceful 
and full of power. For the first time in this 
reporter's local experience, American Karate 
men began to resemble the style and authority 
of their Japanese counterparts. 

The "villian" of the day, elected by the 
unanimous boos of the crowd, was Robert Mc- 
Neill of the Philadelphia Karate Club. McNeill, 
a massive bull of a Brown Belt, was surprisingly 
fast and deceptive, but his style consisted of 
driving in against the opposition with his chest 
and pummeling with his heavy fists. Apparently 
his opponents were not used to Karate at such 
close range. In any case he played like he was 
wearing a suit of Kendo armor, and for a while 
he got away with it. 

At one point Black Belt James Nye accidently 
connected with a punch to McNeill's jaw. There 
was no score — points were given only for "well- 
focused" punches pulled short — but it left Mc- 
Neill a little stunned. When his head cleared 
he glowered at Nye and paced savagely, and 
when the word was given to resume he charged. 
It looked for a while like one of those childish 
losses of self control that have defaced other 
Karate tournaments here, but apparently it was 
just psychological warfare. Nye, amused, gently 
tapped McNeill's huge jaw to mock him. But 
McNeill won the match with a half-point, and 
Nye was no longer amused. 

Black Belt Curt Blackwood of the New York 
Karate Club stalked his opponents throughout 
the afternoon with a rolling dip of the shoulder, 
very much like the calypso dances of his native 
West Indies. The movement was effective; Black- 
wood fought his way into the final match against 
Paulin, and placed second in the kumite compe- 
tition. 



A demonstration of women Karate self-defense received 
warm applause from the spectators. 



19 

Copyrighted material 



Black Belt Leslie Safar of Philadelphia also 
showed outstanding technique. Small and quick, 
he would play a waiting game, sizing up his 
opponents, then finishing them with flurries of 
apparently deadly accuracy. He scored one of 
the more spectacular points of the day against 
the much taller Robert Shapoff. Shapoff played 
with a leading left foot, and after a few tries 
Safar knocked the foot out with a sweeping kick 
to the ankle. Shapoff went down so hard and 
so fast that Safar would have gotten a full point 
and a round of applause in any Judo contest. He 
was on top of the prostrate Shapoff with a series 
of pile-driving punches to win the match. 

There were two parallel sets of eliminations. 
After Blackwood defeated Safar to become the 
Red Team champion, Paulin and Bull McNeill 
took the stage to settle the matter for the White. 
This was the match the crowd was waiting for. 
Could McNeill smash his way to the top? Could 
the smaller champion stand up to him? Each 
had his thousands cheering. 

Unknown to the audience, though, ■McNeill 
was Paulin's student. He knew the champion's 
techniques, but apparently had found in prac- 
tice that he couldn't bull his teacher down. He 
played Paulin at a distance, and Paulin, realizing 
the anesthetic in his back was wearing off, faced 
him stiff and cautious. 

The first match went to a three-minute draw. 
The second was also indecisive until, near the 
end, Paulin scored a half-point with his favoirte 
technique, a left front kick up the middle. When 
time ran out Paulin was still a half point ahead 
and the judges gave him the match. 

In the final match the auditorium was tensely 
silent as Paulin, standing straight, was stalked 
round and round by the cat-like Blackwood. Un- 
like the other matches, this was to be decided 
by two points. 

Paulin struck first, with a front kick up the 
middle for a full point. Shortly afterward the 
two clashed again, and as they broke Paulin 
tripped and fell awkwardly on his back. But 
Blackwood was leaning to the rear and could 
not get in in time to take advantage. 

It began to look like Paulin had already passed 
his toughest competitor in McNeill and had the 
tournament in his pocket. But in a close exchange 

20 




The overall champion of the meet, Jules Paulin of the 
Philadelphia Karate Club took 1st place in both kumite 
(sparring) and KATA (form) competition. He won the 
same three trophies at last year's East Coast Champion- 
ships and went on to win the 1962 All-America Karate 
Tournament at Los Angeles. Paulin is also three-time 
Pennsylvania State Karate Champ. 

the aggressive Blackwood fired a punch into the 
solar plexus and evened the match one-all. 

The two circled again, each alert, each watch- 
ing for the final point. As they passed the foot- 
lights at stage center they both attacked simul- 
taneously. In the vigorous exchange Paulin's left 
foot ripped up again to the belly, and referee 
Nishiyama called "Ippon!" Paulin, the cham- 
pion, had really earned his trophy, and the crowd 
gave him a champion's ovation. 

Jules Paulin also took the kata trophy, win- 
ning 42/2 points with a Bassai Dai kata. He 

Copyrighted material 




Some of the teams assembled for -pre -tournament ceremony. 




Jules Paulin of the Philadelphia Karate Club receives 
certificate and trophy from James McDonnell, President 
of the Tournament, Vice-Chairman of the American 
Wrestling Foundation and former Deputy Chief Inspec- 
tor of the New York City Police Department. 




Brown Belts Abner Smith (I) of the Philadelphia Karate 
Club and Fred Martinez in free sparring competitions. 



went through the formal ,dance-like movements 
with a grace and power not usually exhibited 
by any but the higher-ranking Japanese. Leslie 
Safar impressed the judges by picking the kata 
Hangetsu, one not on the program, and doing it 
with such authority that he was awarded 41 '/ 2 
points by the judges, who included Masters 
Nishiyama, Okazaki and Arito. Curt Blackwood 
took third with a 38/ 2 point Bassai Dai. James 
Ambrose got 38 points with a Heian Ni-Dan 
kata, and White Belt David Ost earned 37/ 2 
points with a Tekki Shodan, outpointing many 




Champions with their trophies. Jules Paulin ( c) of the 
Philadelphia Karate Club placed 1st in both KATA 
(form) and KUMITE (sparring) competitions to the 
overall championship. Robert McNeill (I) of Phila- 
delphia placed 3rd in KUMITE and was aicarded a Sony 
transistor radio for his display of the best fighting 
spirit of the day. Curt Blackwood (r) of the New York 
Karate Club placed 2nd in KUMITE and 3rd in KATA 
competitions. Not shown is Leslie Safar of Philadelphia, 
2nd in kata and 3rd place tie in kumite. Paulin also 
received a Konica camera for his overall victory. 

other contestants well ahead of him in rank. 

At tournament's end Paulin was awarded first- 
place trophies for kumite and kata competition, 
and the trophy and Konica camera for the over- 
all championship. Second and third place kata 
trophies went to Safar and Blackwood, and 
Blackwood took the second plate trophy for 
kumite. Safar and McNeill shared trophies for 
third place in kumite competition, and McNeill 
was awarded a Sony transistor radio. 

The tournament was conducted under the 
rules and auspices of the Japan Karate Assoc. O 

21 

Copyrighted material 



CAPOEIRA 



/ 



BRAZILIANS KARATE 



The Players 
would jump, 
weave, gambol, 
trip, and 

kick their 
opponents, then 
avoid retaliation 
by slithering 
on the ground 
ike serpents. 




Demonstrating knowledge 
of body leverage, 
Master Pastinha 
prepares to throw his 
opponent off balance. 



22 



by Master Pastinha 



Some 400 years ago in Angola, on the west 
coast of Africa, a form of combat practiced 
by the natives was beginning to take shape 
in what we would today call a martial art. 

Four centuries later, thanks to a mutual 
tie with Portugal which Angola shares 
with Brazil, Capoeira is practiced in that 
South American nation. It is no longer the 
savage method of self-defense which origi- 
nated in the dark continent, however. And 
thereby hangs a tale. 

In the days of the great plantations, the 
owners took a dim view of the capability for 
mayhem which the natives possessed. Prac- 
titioners of Capoeira suffered great perse- 
cution at the hands of the owner-dominated 
police. 

In order to avoid this persecution, the Ca- 
poeristas began to camouflage their "sport" 
by turning it into a weird dance, consisting 
of pantomime, music, and dances. Capoeira 
ceased to be a matter of violence and death, 
and became an amusement. It became the 
custom to remark that "the natives are play- 
ing Angola style." 

Even the plantation foremen would ap- 
plaud the "performances" as the "players" 
would jump, weave, gambol, trip, and kick 
their opponents, then avoid retaliation by 
slithering on the ground like serpents. 

So in spite of early difficulties, Capoeira 
caught on. Legendary names appeared — in- 
vincible fighters, men with flesh impenetra- 
ble by knife or bullet ; men under contract to 
the devil; men with charms against the most 
powerful of enemies ; men who could liberate 
themselves from any kind of a trap. 
INSTRUMENTS OF CAPOEIRA 

The Berimbau (a kind of jews harp) can 
be divided into two types: The Berimbau de 
boca, and the Berimbau de barriga. The 
Berimbau de boca was used by the old An- 
golians, hence, it used to be said that it came 
originally from Angola. This, however, is 
contested by some students of the subject. It 
consists of a bow that tightens a cord of 
"timbo" (a kirid of vine). The resonating 
chamber is the mouth of the player. The cord 
is made to vibrate by striking it with a knife. 



The Berimbau de barriga is the most usual 
type. It is formed by a piece of wood called 
"the pigeon" which maintains tension in a 
steel wire. The resonator is a small gourd at- 
tached to the wire by a string. The wire pro- 
duces a sound which is modulated by a cop- 
per coin, while the mouth of the gourd is 
placed at varying distances from the abdo- 
men of the player. 

The Berimbau has many quivering vibra- 
tions which are marvelously adapted to the 
reproduction in sound of the swaying of hips 
and the feline jumping of the Capoeiristas. 
Independently of this, it lends a melancholy 
note to the singing of "Lundus" which ac- 
company the movements of the game of Ca- 
poeira. 

According to Oneyda Alvarenga, the music 
of the Berimbau is a "force activating the 
energies of two combatants, and in such man- 
ner the music ties itself to the game so that 
the latter is entirely dependent upon it, and 
is regulated by it." So, the ardor of the battle 
grows in accordance with the crescendo or 
ralentando of the music. 

The other instrument which accompanied 
the evolution of the Capoeira is the caxixi. 
It consists of a round bamboo basket with 
dried seeds inside. The orifice is covered with 
dried gourd skin. It acts as an accompani- 
ment to the Berimbau. Each time the wire 
resounds, it is accompanied by the rattle of 
the dried seeds. 

The third instrument which frequently ac- 
companies the game of Capoeira is the "reco- 
reco." It is a large segment of bamboo, in 
which have been made innumerable lateral 
incisions for the escape of the air, which is 
caused to vibrate by a piece of cane which is 
scraped across the incisions in the side of the 
bamboo, thus producing the characteristic 
sounds. 

Finally, we must consider the Pandeiro. It 
is a regional instrument, used not only to ac- 
company the Capoeira, but also to mark the 
shaking rhythm of our sambas. Its shape is 
well known — the circle of quince wood, the 
goatskin top, and the jingles of Flemish tin. 
Certain societies of Capoeira use agogo. 



23 

Copyrighted material 





An hit opponent drops to the floor to avoid hit attack, 
Capoeira Master Vincente Ferreira Pastinha of Brazil 
aims hick. Stylized maneuver is dance-like in its 
execution. 



TUNES OF THE BERIMBAU 

The Berimbau is used by the accompa- 
nists of the Capoeira to produce definite and 
resolute tunes which modulate the rhythms 
of the game. The most important are the fol- 
lowing : 

Sao Bento Grande - the light game 

Sao Bento Pequeno - Samba of the Capoeira 



Banquela 

Santa Maria 
Ave Maria 
Amazonas 
Iuna 



- The Knife Game - lively, 
animated 

- The Measured Game 

- The Capoeira Hymn 

- The Middle Game 

- The Creeping Game 




From his defensive position, the 74-year-old Master 
Pastinha counterattacks. 



Cavalaria - A signal denouncing the 

proximity of strangers 

Angolinha 
Samba de Angola 

In view of what we tell, it is easy to under- 
stand the character of the game of Capoeira. 

At the sound of the music of Sao Bento Pe- 
queno the combat is transfigured into the 
clashing of the Samba. 

The good masters of Capoeira, in order to 
give a demonstration of singular ability in 
this game, after blows and counterblows, 
much whirling in the space left by the tangle 
of arms and legs, end the battle without show- 
ing a single spot or stain on their Sunday 
clothes. 

The old masters, such as I, are capable of 
similar feats. At my age, 74, I also perform 
with my pupils. I would like to give exhibi- 
tions in any part of the world. 

As a Brazilian, I am proud of this friendly 
country, which may wish to give me an op- 
portunity to exhibit myself and my pupils 
there, in order to show our American 
brothers the possibilities of a personal de- 
fense against an enemy — An adversary or 
several adversaries, without the necessity of 
using firearms or knives. 

On the contrary, the Capoeirista, meeting 
his adversary armed with a weapon, has the 
possibility by means of the lightness and quick- 
ness of Capoeira, to disarm his opponent by 
taking his weapon from him; or, if it is not 
possible to take the weapon, to vanquish him 
by tripping and throwing the armed adver- 
sary to the ground. 

Even though the Capoeirista may be phys- 
ically inferior to his opponent, a good Ca- 
poeirista has no fear of him, be he of superior 
physiquej be he a younger man, or be he 
armed tooth and nail. 

In case it may not be possible for me to 
demonstrate Capoeira in America, I shall be 
proud if your people may have an opportun- 
ity to come to our land of Brazil — to live at 
Salvador-Bahia — to know intimately this 
game, this personal defense, which is the 
Capoeira, substituting well for any weapon, 
physical force, or age, for self-defense. Q 



24 




This section is devoted entirely to promotion in 
ranks of the various organizations throughout the 
world. Any group or groups interested are requested 
to submit all promotion lists, preferably with group 
photos, properly identified with names and ranks, to: 
Editor, Black Belt Magazine, 1288 S. La Brea, Los 
Angeles 19, California. 



PROMOTIONS 



KENDO 

1963 promotional meet of the Kendo 
Federation of United States held Sept. 
13, 1963 at the Pasadena Cultural Cen- 
ter Hall, 505 Cypress Ave., Pasadena, 
California. The meet was held in con- 
junction with the visit of the top ranking 
Kendo masters from Japan. 

The promotion was held for the rank 
of 2nd Degree (Nidan) and up; they 
are as follows: 

2nd Degree (Nidan): Shugi Asari, Yorou- 
ichi Asari, Dr. Vance Hall, G. Jones, 
Minoru Kusuya, Gene Stormer, Norito 
Takamoto. 

3rd Degree (Sandan): Michiro Mura- 
kami, Tadashi Shima, Nobutsugu Tokuno. 
4th Degree (Yodan): Sumuo Kawashima, 
Sado Kubo, Pat Morosaka. 
5th Degree (Godan): Saburo Akuni, Gene 
Eto. 

5th Degree (Godan), Ren-shi: Tokuji Ma- 
suda, Suichi Obata, Tadashi Onami, 
Hiroji Kamimura, Sugio Kawaguchi. 
6th Degree (Rokudan), Ren-shi: Tadao 
Amamiya, Hisashi Higuchi, Haruo Ka- 
gawa, Hirouki Miyahara, Jiihi Soejima. 
6th Degree (Rokudan), Kyo-shi: Akiyo 
Hara, Yutaka Fukunaga, Keigo Miura, 
Masami Otsubo, Masaharu Shimoda, 
Yoshinobu Takeguchi, Larry Iwao Yone- 
moto, Dr. Gordan Warner. 
7th Degree (Shichidan): Hiroji Miyahara, 
Torataro Nakabara, Yutaka Kubota. 
8th Degree (Hachidan), Han-shi: Torao 
Mori. 



JUDO 

Yudanshakai (JBBF), Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia — Oct 12, 1963. 
Sandan (3rd degree): Bob Hutchins, San 
Diego. 

Shodan (1st degree): Jun Shimoji of 
Pasadena, Hiroshi Kuwabara of Sawtelle, 
Terry Karmann of San Diego. 
Ikkyu (1st kyu): T. Okimoto of Venice, 
Ernie Imoto of San Fernando, Bill Jack- 
son of ELA, Orrin Collier of San Diego. 
Nikyu (2nd kyu): Jim Yokotake, Gerald 
Bryan, Tadashi Kano, Bob Minami of 
Sawtelle; Ken Shimizu, Terry Kunihiro of 
Hollywood; Patrick Smith, Katsuji Nerio, 
Mike Smith, Gray Bromlefge of Orange 



County; Hortiz Eamperio, Peter Alber of 
San Diego; Richard Kenis, Kenneth Cool 
of Jundokan; Robert Kuroda, Jack Duger 
of Seinan; Al Owens of Sendai; Sanford 
Otsuji of Venice; Charles Fuertch of Lake- 
wood; Sanford Remington of Gardena; 
Jim Osborn of Long Beach Naval Sta- 
tion; and Bill Wagner. 

Renmei, San Gabriel, Calif. — Sept 28, 
1963. 



Godan (5th degree): Gene LeBell, Kiy- 
oshi Sakimoto, Kenzo Nakawatase.Tokuo 
Ota. 

Sandan (3rd degree): Ed Inouye, T. Nari- 
toku. 

Nidan (2nd degree): Ben Smith, James 

Wedner, Robert Fields. 

Shodan (1st degree): Joe Vilota, Dennis 

Fukumoto, Walter David, Jim Sondese, 

Bruce Brighton, J. Hagio. 

Ikkyu (1st kyu): Jack Wilson. 

Nikyu (2nd kyu): Elliot Fukumoto. 



Sitting left to right: Joe Ike-shodan (1st degree), 
Fred Yanagihara-shodan (1st degree), Bob 
Foler-ikkyu (1st class), Earl Becker sankyu (3rd 
class), Jenether Cephas-sankyu (3rd class); 
Center row left to right: Vincent Falcone-san- 
yu (3rd class), Mitsuo Ikeda-sankyu (3rd class). 



KARATE 

All America Karate Federation, Los An- 
geles, Calif. — Oct. 6, 1963. 
Shodan (1st degree): Henry Kong. 
Sanyu (3rd kyu): Harry Kresse, Frank 
Smith, Bill Malpezzi, David Tamashiro. 
Yonkyu (4th kyu): Akira Kadowaki, Rei 
Fujikawa. 

Gokyu (5th kyu): Elaine Shinagawa, Ben- 
jamin Tabon, Lucine Martin, Bill White- 
law, Robert Towns, James Fawcett, Mar- 
vin Takaki, James Alkaire, Walter Boberg, 
Jim Graham. 

Rokyu (6th kyu): Fred Zufryden, James 
Saiki, James Masatsugu, Elaine Ogawa, 
Vincent Hozier, Steve O'Reilly, Paul Jack- 
son. 

Shichikyu (7th kyu): Gerhard Gohler, 
Shoichi Yamamoto, Hugh Mangum, Don- 
ald Cass Jr., Rey Ochoa, Robert Ferrall, 
Brian Matravers, David AM, John Saxon, 
Fred Hudgins, Roger Duerrstein, Ralph 
Norris, Raymond Pineda, Tom Miya, Le- 
land Sapiro, John Boyer. 



Ray Miller-sankyu (3rd class) and Jerry Smith- 
yonkyu (4th class); back row: Aikido instruc- 
tors Tadahiro Ishibashi and Masaru Kurihara. 

U.S. Army Photo by SP 5 John W. Tuckish 



AIKIDO 

Tokyo Aiki-kai Headquarters, Camp Zama, Japan. 




25 

Copyrighted material 



DO JO Bulletin Board 




Nishiyama Heads All America 
Karate Federation 



By Bill Evans 
Los Angeles, Calif. — Master Hide- 
take Nishiyama has recently moved 
his Karate School to a new Los 
Angeles location. This new school 
will be the headquarters for the 
All American Karate Federation, 
serving all of North America. 
Nishiyama is personally supervis- 
ing the entire federation. 

Upon Nishiyama's move, Tsu- 
tomu Oshima assumes the role of 
chief instructor of the California 
Karate Association at the former 
address. 



Add New Weapon to U.N. Arsenal, 
Japanese Yawara 

Kashu Mainichi 
United Nations — Two types of 
stick fighting, one with a Japan- 
ese flavor, have been added to the 
weaponry of the U. N. security 
guard force which does not carry 
pistols. 

Clarifying a description of the 
new techniques furnished by a 
U. N. official, the security force 
instructor said one type with 30- 
inch long batons is modeled chief- 
ly on a system for crowd control 
used by the New York City Police 
Department. 

The Japanese type of stick 
fighting is yawara named for the 



instruments used by the guards. 
This is a stick about eight inches 
long and six inches wide that 
makes them an effective punching 
weapon. 

Picked squads of the U. N. Se- 
curity Force of 176 recently com- 
pleted a year of training in stick 
fighting. 

The squads, trained by a New 
York Police Force expert and 
by imported experts, have been 
learning to thrust, parry and club 
in sessions since the assembly's 
resumed session ended last spring. 

The men were also trained in 
flying wedge formations to break 
up street or plaza groups and to 
protect notables — or any other 
U. N. participant that might find 
himself under attack. 

Frank N. Begley, head of the 
U. N. Buildings Service, said the 
batons are being issued as stan- 
dard equipment "when necessary" 
to guards. 



Sept. 1 - Los Angeles, Calif. — AAU 
National Judo Champion, Kazuo 
Shinohara, Go-dan (5th degree), 
wedded lovely Margaret G. Ohara 
at the West L.A. Buddhist Church. 
Rev. Fumio Fujimura officiated 
the ceremony. 



Gala Luau 
Sept. 7 - Gardena, Calif. — The 1st 
luau, sponsored by the California 
Aiki Kai, was a great success, and 
plans are underway for another 
in the future. Although only 150 
tickets were sold in advance, some 
300 people showed up that eve- 
ning. 

Authentic Hawaiian dishes were 
served, and entertainment was 
provided by a group of Hawaiian 
dancers. The proceeds will be 
used to help defray the cost of 
Master Koichi Tohei's, ku-dan 
(9th degree), coming visit to the 
United States early next year. 



Loyola University Forms Karate Club 

By Bill Evans 
Los Angeles, Calif. — Students at 
Loyola University of L.A. have re- 
cently organized a Karate club, 
consisting of some twenty-five 
members. Plans are underway to 



a 

i 

H 
u 



£ 

The bride, a school teacher, is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mi- 
toshi Ohara of West Los Angeles, 
and the groom, affiliated with 
American Honda Motors, is the 
eldest son of Hisao Shinohara of 
Ehime-ken, Japan. 



Champ Takes A Bride 




26 



incorporate this club into the AH 
America Karate Federation, thus 
enabling members to receive in- 
struction from Master Nishiyama 
and also to participate in the Fed- 
eration's tournaments. 

Instructor Bill Knittle stated: 
"With Judo champion Paul Maru- 
yama representing Loyola in the 
Olympics, interest in the Japan- 
ese sports has increased here on 
the campus. We hope that in the 
near future, our team will win 
some championships also. The 
way the students are progressing, 
I feel very confident that we will." 



Schools Trade Demonstrations 

Los Angeles — Two self-defense 
schools in the Los Angeles area 
traded demonstrations recently. 
Don Angier, an exponent of Shi- 
dare Yanagi Ryu Jiu-jitsu, took 
some of his students to the Santa 
Monica YMCA to put on an ex- 
hibition of their style of self-de- 
fense. In return, Bill Randle, an 
instructor of Kodenkan Jiu-jitsu 
at the YMCA, went to Angier's 
school a few weeks later to ex- 
plain the tenets of his system. 

They tried through their dem- 
onstrations to create better under- 
standing and a closer link among 
the various Martial Arts. They 
hope that other schools will fol- 
low their example, thus making 
the various arts better known and 
creating friendliness among the 
practitioners of these arts. 



Japan Eyes Medals In Judo 

Tokyo — Of the 15 or so gold 
medals which Japan hopes to win 
in the 1964 Olympic Games, four 
are expected in judo which has 
been added to the official pro- 
gram for the first time. 

Cabinet Minister Eisaku Sato, 
who has been designated Olympic 
affair minister in addition to his 
other posts, recently declared Ja- 
pan must win in judo "at any 
cost." 

As the birthplace of judo, Jap- 
anese judoists or judokas or judo 
players, whichever term you may 
use for this originally conceived 
art of self-defense and character- 
building, should respond to Sato's 
declaration. 



Judo, Volleyball To Be Dropped 
From '68 Olympics 

The International Olympic com- 
mittee Thursday eliminated four 
sports from the 1968 Olympian 
program, thereby reducing the list 
to the prescribed number of 18. 

Voted off the schedule were ju- 
do, archery, volleyball and hand- 
ball. Other sports under consider- 
ation for deletion were cycling 
and soccer. 

Out of 53 voting members pres- 
ent at the afternoon session, 37 
were against judo, 33 against 
handball, 32 against archery and 
25 against volleyball. 

The reports by the organizing 
committee of Innsbruck and To- 
kyo, host cities for the 1964 
Olympics, were heard and ac- 
cepted "with great satisfaction." 



Judo, Volleyball Dropped 
From '68 Olympics 

Tokyo — Japanese sports offi- 
cials Friday were shocked and 
disappointed to hear that the 
International Olympic committee 
had erased judo and volleyball 
from the official program of the 
1968 Olympic Games. 

At Japan's request, judo and 
volleyball were added to the of- 
ficial program of the Tokyo Olym- 
pic Games next year. 

Japan hopes to win all gold 
medals in the four weight class- 
ifications of judo and both gold 
medals in the men's and women's 
volleyball competition next year. 

Japanese entries won all four 
titles in judo and the men and 
women captured the volleyball 
titles in the pre-Olympic Tokyo 
International Sports Week which 
ended Wednesday. 

Rise! Kano, president of the 
Japan Judo Federation, said irre- 
spective of the I.O.C. action, the 
federation will adhere to its pol- 
icy of staging world champion- 
ships. 

"We will wait until judo is of- 
ficially recognized by the I.O.C. 
as a sport to be included in the 
Olympic program," Kano said. 

Yutaka Maeda, president of the 
Japan Volleyball Assn., said "I 
cannot believe that the I.O.C. has 
removed volleyball from the 1968 
Olympic Games especially when a 
total of 118 countries are reprei- 



sented in the International Vol- 
leyball Federation. 

"We have fiv.- years to go be- 
fore the 1968 Olympic Games and 
we intend to work on the I.O.C. 
to have volleyball reinstated." 

But there are those who fear 
that the Japanese experts may 
again be too optimistic even if 
quite contrary to original concep- 
tions about judo, the competition 
will be divided into four divisions 
— a heavyweight, middleweight, 
lightweight and open weight. Size 
had never been considered in the 
rules of judo. 

A news dispatch from Paris 
two years ago that Anton Geesink, 
a Dutchman, had won the world 
judo championship by immobiliz- 
ing Japan's pride, Koji Sone, was 
at first considered a mistake in 
cabling. It shocked the entire Jap- 
anese nation. Had it been prewar 
Japan, there might have been 
some harakiris (disembowelment 
suicides) among higher-ups in the 
judo circles of the humiliation. 

Members of the Japanese team 
which went to Paris were most 
confident. And they had reason to 
be so. In the first world champion- 
ships held in Tokyo in 1956, the 
two Japanese representatives Yo- 
shihiko Yoshimatsu, 7th dan, and 
Shokichi Natsui, 6th dan, easily 
defeated competitiors from 27 
nations. Yoshimatsu defeated Gee- 
sink in the semi-finals but lost to 
Natsui in the finals. 

In the second world champion- 
ships in Tokyo in 1958, Sone, 5th 
dan, won the coveted title by de- 
feating teammate, Akio Kamin- 
aga, 4th dan, in the finals. Kimi- 
yoshi Yamashiki, 6th dan, of Ja- 
pan won by a fall in 4 minutes 18 
seconds over Geesink in the quar- 
ter-finals. Yamashiki was beaten 
by Kaminaga in the semi-finals. 

Although in the next two years, 
Geesink trained conscientiously 
from time to time at the Kodo- 
kan, mecca of judo, members of 
the Japanese team believed one 
of them would certainly be the 
winner at the third world cham- 
pionships at Paris, in December, 
1961. 

But Geesink, the giant judoka 
from the Netherlands, was ready 
for them. He beat them all and 
emerged the surprise new world 
champion in judo at which the 
Japanese had been considered in- 
( Con tinned on next page) 



Copyrighted material 



DO JO Bulletin Board 

= ==== i i i i ^^^^^^^^^= ===== 



Japan-U S. Goodwill lai-do Exhibition 



vincible because of superior tech- 
nique. 

The leader of the Japanese 
team returned to Tokyo Interna- 
tional Airport and apologized to 
the entire nation for failure to 
win the championship at Paris. 

The question now is: Will there 
be a second Ceesink at the Tokyo 
Olympic Games next year. 

Ceesink, himself, although only 
30, is not expected to compete. 
He told the writer in Tokyo while 
he trained for the 1961 world 
championships at Paris that he 
did not think of competing in the 
Tokyo Olympic Games because 
his eligibility would probably be 
questioned. 

" I run a physical training 
school in Holland and I might be 
classed as a professional in which 
case I would not be eligible to par- 
ticipate in the Olympic Games," 
Geesink said at that time. 

Geesink finally convinced the 
Japanese judo experts that weight 
and size do count where the two 
competitors are the equal in tech- 
nique. For the Dutchman had 
trained so conscientiously as to 
succeed in mastering the intricate 
technique. 

At the same time, some of the 
older Japanese experts have shak- 
en their heads in resignation, say- 
ing that today's Japanese judoists 
lack the brilliant technique of for- 
mer judo greats, who won their 
matches with falls and not by de- 
cisions. 

A Russian "Sambo" team ar- 
rived in Japan last February and 
made an impressive showing 
against Japanese judokas to cause 
some concern here. But a students 
judo squad competed recently in 
Russia, winning all matches there. 
Returning to Japan, the manager 
said, "We don't have to be wor- 
ried about Russian judokas." 

Thirty top Japanese judoists 
have been going through inten- 
sive training at the foot of Mt. 
Fuji. 

An answer to just how effective 
this strenuous training is will be 
given during the pre-Olympic 
Meet in Tokyo, Oct. 11-16. 



By James M. Sleeper, USARJ-IO, 
Sports Writer. 
U.S. Army Photograph 

Sept. 25 - Zama, Japan — The 
combined Japan - U. S. Goodwill 
iia-do (Japanese swordfighting) 
Exhibition and the 34th Anniver- 
sary of the Dai-Nippon Shinken- 
kai (all- Japan fencing school's) 
exhibition attracted 10,000 spec- 
tators and 300 participants. Spon- 
sored by the Matsuo Kempu dojo 
and co-sponsored by Kanagawa 
Prefecture, Yokohama City and 
the Kanagawa Shimbun, the ex- 
hibition contained a large variety 
of ancient Japanese arts and cere- 
monies. 

Demonstrations of Aikido, Ka- 
rate, Judo, and Kendo were per- 
formed on the main floor of the 
Yokohama Cultural Gymnasium. 
Japan's famous tea ceremony, 
Kenbu (a sword dance), Shibu 
(an ancient dance), flower ar- 
rangement, and Koto music took 
place on the stage. 

The main attractions of the 



event were demonstrations of lai 
(sword), Yari (spear), Jo (staff), 
Kusarigama (chain and sickle, 
and Chigiriki (chain and stick). 
The spectators were awed by the 
display of the Okinawa Kobudo 
(Okinawa's ancient military arts) 
and Batto-jitsu (cutting power of 
the sword). 

At the close of the exhibition 
Japan Prime Minister Hayato Ike- 
da, president of the Zen-Nippon 
Iai-do Renmei, awarded the Presi- 
dent's Banner to Kiyoshi Wata- 
nabe, Iai-do 8th Degree (Hachi- 
dan) and the President's Cup 
went to Masao Uenodan, Iai-do 
7th Degree (Shichidan). 

Governor Iwataro Uchiyama of 
Kanagawa Prefecture presented a 
trophy to Joseph Cummins of the 
U.S. Army. Cummins is recognized 
in Japan as the foremost foreigner 
in the arts of Kobudo. The Gov- 
ernor's cups went to Hideo Taki, 
Iai-do 8th Degree ( Hachidan ) and 
to a Karate master. 

Mayor of Yokohama City's Cup 
was awarded to Yutaka Kaneda. 




Master Matsuo displays cutting ability of famous Japanese sword. 



28 



BACK 
ISSUES 

OF BLACK BELT 

For those who missed our previ- 
ous issues and who wish to com- 
plete their Black Belt Library, we 
are pleased to announce that 
back copies are now available. 
Unfortunately, we are out of the 
2nd issue. Send one dollar for 
each capy desired. This sum will 
cover handilng and mailing for 
each issue you may have missed. 
Please check the following-. 
VOLUME ONE 

□ 1st \J3rd \J4th Q5ih [J6th 

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□ 1st 

BLACK BELT, INC. 

1288 South La Brea Ave. 
Los Angeles, California 90019 





Kazue Ichimura, 6th degree (Ro- 
ku-dan) left, and Joseph Cum- 
mins, 6th degree (Roku-dan), 



demonstrate Muso-ryu Jo-jitsu, a 
method of quarterstaff fighting 
originated in the Tokugawa's era. 




U.S. Army personnel, from Camp 
Zama, Japan, who participated in 
the lai-do event, are left to right: 
John W. Tuckish II, Douglas A. 



Tanner, Kazue Ichimura, 6th de- 
gree (Roku-dan), an employee 
of USARJ Provost Marshal and 
Joseph Cummins, 6th degree. 




Douglas A. Tanner displays the 
form of Tachi-Iai. 



Thirty-four Judo competitors with eleven officials and instructors 
making up the South aggregation for the annual North-South Judo 
Meet held on November 2 at South San Francisco High School board 
an Western Airlines plane at L. A. International Airport. Among the 
officials were: Director Shigeo Tashima, 6th Degree (Rokudan); 
Manager Kenneth Kuniyuki, 6th Degree; Assistant Manager Shag 
Okada, 4th Degree; and coaches, Sumiyoshi Nozaki, 5th Degree, and 
Henry Iriye, 5th Degree. 



29 

Copyrighted material 



AIKIDO: basic technique 



Katate-Tori Kokyu-Nage (Irimi) 




Fig. 1. Attacker seizes your left wrist with his right hand. Keep 
your left hand relaxed; if you keep it rigid, the attacker will 
have a better grip and an advantage over you. Pour your "ki" 
through your left hand and flow it through your fingers which 
are pointed toward his -back. Then lower your hips and move 
your left foot forward on the outside of attacker's right foot; 
immediately followed by the right foot to break attacker's pos- 
ture. Meantime move your right hand upward toward attacker's 
neck. Pour your "ki" vigorously and this will cause attacker to 
tilt his head slightly backward. 




Fig. 2. As attacker loses his balance, lift your right leg and 
place it at the back of attacker. Your right hand, curling around 
attacker's, should then be pointed toward the mat to complete 
the throw. 



Copyrigl 




Katate-tori Kokyunage (tenkan) 



Fig. 1. Attacker faces you directly and grabs your left wrist 
with his right hand. You flow your ki (mind) toward and out of 
your finger tips (insert photo A.). From a left hanmi position 
you move your left foot forward slightly and pivot clock wise 
with your hip. Automatically the palm of your hand will be facing 
up (insert Photo B). Step quickly forward with your left foot and 
keep moving in a clock-wise circle. 



Note: At all times you must have your ki flowing, otherwise the 
attacker will not follow you. You must keep your ki forward as 
you move or you cannot lead the attacker. Once your ki stops, 
you will find it quite difficult to keep it started again. 




Fig. 2. The attacker will keep holding your right wrist and will 
follow your movement as long as you keep flowing your ki. Then 
lower your hips by bending your knees and the attacker will 
follow suit. 




Fig. 3. Suddenly lift yourself up as soon as you know the at- 
tacker has caught up with you, move your left hand toward the 
attacker's neck, and simultaneously move your left foot back of 
the attacker. Then lower your hip down as the attacker is 
falling backward. 





Hand A leads the "ki" of hand B by bending his 
wrist and have its fingers directed exactly as Hand B. 



Hand A points its fingers upward in the same direc- 
tions of Hand B to lead the ki of Hand B. 



31 

Copyrighte 




TANG SOO DO FLIES 
HIGH AT MARCH 
AIR FORCE RASE 



The Moo Duk. Kwan, an 
international organization 
dedicated to the ancient art 
of KARATE from Seoul, Ko- 
rea, has made its mark in the 



United States via a small 
hard core group of Karate 
enthusiasts known as the 
American Tang Soo Do As- 
sociation. 



By TSgt. Ted May field 
Photos by SSgt. Ivo Smith 

The largest group of Ameri- 
can Tang Soo Do members is 
located at March Air Force 
Base, Riverside, California, 
headquarters of the Strategic 
Air Command's Fifteenth 
Air Force. 

The Southern California 
team is under the leadership 
of Airman First Class Carlos 
Norris, First Degree (sho- 
dan), who became interested 
in Karate while serving with 
the Air Force in Korea in 
1960. 

The American group was 
organized by Air Force Staff 
Sergeant Robert Thompson, 
Second Degree (ni-dan), and 
authenticated by Kwang Kee, 
President of the Interna- 
tional Moo Duk Kwan, in Oc- 
tober 1961. Today, amid the 
wind swept mountains of 
Colorado in Colorado Springs, 
the American Tang Soo Do 
Association maintains its or- 
ganization center. 

The spark of interest in 
Karate on March Air Force 
Base has been enthusiastic. 
The team now has approxi- 
mately 40 students ranging 
from White to Green Bits. 

Lieutenant General Archie 
J. Old, Jr., Commander of 
Fifteenth Air Force and a 
member of the Karate team, 
was presented with an hon- 
orary First Degree (sho-dan) 
by th President of the Moo 
Duk Kwan, an extremely 
rare award, for his outstand- 
ing personal support and par- 
ticipation in physical fitness 
programs. The honorary 
award came as a most pleas- 



32 



15th Air Force's Kicho II Bu to Ba-sy with ability, speed and alertness and coordination of mind and 

body wins respect of its commanding officer. 




ant and welcome surprise to 
General Old, who said, "Since 
physical fitness is stressed in 
my comand, I have great re- 
spect for Karate and those 
devoted to it." 

Airman Norris has devel- 
oped an amazing professional 
polish in the March AFB 
team in the short time since 
its organization. During ex- 
hibitions the team performs 
every movement with split- 
second accuracy. 

Over 75 law enforcement 
officers form the Riverside 
City police, sheriff's depart- 
ment, and California High- 
way Patrol got a close look 
at Karateists in action re- 
cently when the March AFB 
team presented a demonstra- 
tion for the group. 

The officers, including 
Sheriff Joe Rice, watched the 
Tang Soo Do members per- 
form everything from Kicho 
II Bu (motion one) through 
the complicated Ba-sy (mo- 
tion nine). Almost unbeliev- 
ingly they followed every 
action unfolding before them 
as team members demon- 
strated Karate methods of 
taking clubs, guns, blades 
and bottles from a would-be 
aggressor. Boards and tiles 
were split asunder with hand 
and foot with effortless ease. 

When the event came to a 
close team members were en- 
thusiastically singled out by 
the officers to answer ques- 
tions by the score on the appli- 
cation of Karate techniques. 

(Continued on page 55) 




Lt. Gen. Archie J. Old, Jr., Commander of 15th Air 
Force, accepts a honorary 1st Degree (Shodan) in 
Karate from Airman First Class Carlos Norris (left) 
and SSgt. Dalbert Bryan, members of the American 
Tang Soo Do Association at March Air Force Base, 
California. 




Airman First Class Carl Ellis, Green Belt, punches and 
right chops tiro boards with such speed that camera 
catches both breaks, in this body protection movement. 




Airman First Class Carlos Norris, 1st Degree (Shodan), 
breaks the board with a round kick . 



33 



The lure of Feudal Japan with its unforgettable 
samurai still exist in the minds of many. 
Through the medium of chanbara, we can still 
relive and even project ourselves into the 
excitement and adventures of days gone by. 



/ 



(V 



/ 




During my past year In Japan I en- 
joyed as many chanbara or samurai 
motion pictures as I could cram into 
my busy schedule. However, I was 
really quite surprised at the change 
that seems to be developing in the 
various films now being produced. The 
impact of the great change that was 
underway in the Japanese motion pic- 
ture world came quite forceably to the 
front with such realistic pictures as 
Tsubalci Sanjiro and the recent thriller 
Hara Kiri. Technically, as kengeki films, 
both have an excellent award winning 
individual story plot. Both smash hits 
for those who want to live in a cold 
sweat before a blood bath. 

The change which I noted with the 
preview screening of Hara Kiri was of 
course the stark realism present today. 
The chanbara motion picture has come 
of age. The early nationalistic attempts 



at making a chanbara motion picture 
cannot be compared with today's color 
and sound with the tremendous ad- 
vancement in shooting and cutting 
techniques. In the early films the sword 
technique left much to be desired. 

The one classical film which provides 
the audience with all of the thrills and 
yet keeps to the traditional story is the 
old standby "The 47 Ronin." The film 
has now become an annual classic with 
each motion picture studio bringing 
out every star for a specific role. Even 
Toshiro Mifune had a specific part 
that he secretly wanted to play in a 
recent Chushingura film. That is how 
the story touches all Japanese. 

There has now developed four kinds 
of chanbara motion pictures. Two of 
the four will be discussed fully in this 
discussion. The historical samurai mo- 
tion picture cannot be classified as a 



chanbara motion picture, nor can the 
fictional story of a famous ronin be 
classified in the meaning of the word 
chanbara. The two types of films which 
are left, the musical chanbara and the 
mystical-childish prattle would seem to 
leave much to be desired. To review 
the musical and the childish chanbara 
one need only to think of the audience 
which seems to pay for such outrage- 
ous space films. There is nothing what- 
soever connected with the ancient his- 
torical past. 

The musical chanbara does have its 
place as an entertainment medium. 
One of the very best examples are the 
stories of the gamblers during the Edo 
period. There were many famous 
stories about them and their songs 
make one have a feeling for their dif- 
ficult life. 

There is a specific sword technique 



36 



By Dr. Gordon Warner 




How to enjoy a 

SAMURAI 

motion picture 



in the bad man versus the good man 
gambler plots. The western audience 
has had little information so that they 
can distinguish between the samurai 
and the gambler. After all they do 
wear swords in the same way to the 
untrained eye or the novice of a chan- 
bara motion picture. 

It is interesting to note that the 
kengeki or sword technique in the 
recent gambler motion pictures has 
changed for the better. Yet, one is 
led to believe that such action is that 
of a samurai. However, there was a 
martial arts code, although not within 
the printed page, which was adhered 
to by almost everyone. These stories 
are about feudal Japan and the struc- 
ture of the society is clearly illustrated 
in some films which would do justice 
to a good course in Japanese history. 

If Japan is interested in educating 



her youth there is an excellent medium 
available and with an historical back- 
ground ready made. The gambler 
chanbara could be utilized to show 
that perhaps the bad can sleep well, 
but the good sleep and live much 
happier and better. One need only 
to observe the youth of America who 
first find out about cowboy films. 
From that moment onward for many 
fast draw of the good will win over 
the bad. So will the skill with the long 
sword in the hands of the good win 
over the bad. But there is actually a 
realism brought into Japanese films 
since thefr beginning which only re- 
cently has entered the American film. 
The good suffer too and even die. This 
philosophy was withheld by American 
producers who believed that the 
American desired to see the good 
rise over the bad without a scratch — 



never did the good fellow die in the 
final scene. 

It is regrettable that the Japanese 
motion picture industry is apparently 
not interested in tapping its vast re- 
source of potential theater patrons, the 
children and senior citizens. Through 
the use of good techniques which are 
available the stories could be made 
alive for the children and not too 
adultish. The interest would be there 
for the grandparents who like to live 
a bit in the past. Both could be drawn 
into the theater because of a desire 
to be entertained and not bored by 
foolish even utterly stupid movements 
before their intelligent eyes. 

In a recently advertised "samurai 
film" the actors took to swings in a 
park singing about the moon coming 
over the mountains! It was sickening! 
Even the two small children sitting 



37 

Cppyrighted material 




Director Kurosawa instructs riders on movie set, "The Hidden Fortress". 




Toshiro Mifune practices his sword form meticulously in order to give 
realistic and authentic portrayal of a samurai era. Such practice resulted 
in a lightening and yet suspensful climax for Toho's "Yojimbo" . 



next to me with their grandparents 
asked if they could go for a bag of 
popcorn because the picture "isn't 
good, grandma." 

The Japanese motion picture pro- 
ducer must realize that it has been 
basically this point, a true and proven 
fact, that has driven the American 
audience out of the theater. There is 
no one with an ounce of pride in 
motion pictures who does not weep 
when they see the vast number of 
empty motion- picture theaters in 
America and realize that they are 
being added to everyday. A motion 
picture must be a challenge to the 
mind. When the patron begins to 
realize that he is as intelligent as the 
brightest in the picture, then the story 
is lost and so is the theater. 

Now is the time for the Japanese 
motion picture industry to aid in the 
real development of the minds of the 
Japanese youth and the interest of 
foreign audiences. Ask anyone in 
South America why Tsubaki Sanjiro 
and Harikiri were quickly booked when 
the first preview ended. The answer 
is elementary. Both of the pictures 
made the audience (I) think and live 
with the hero in his part, (2) feel that 
what they saw was real, (3) return 
home tired yet keyed up to an awak- 
ening of the world around themselves. 

Japanese motion picture critics, 
who are well aware of what has hap- 
pened to the world motion picture 
audience as well as the death of 
American theater audience, have been 
writing for years, in reviews about 
the foolish American idea that the 
"theater audience is made up of peo- 
ple with the minds of little children, 
so give them a child's view of the 
world." This approach now appears to 
be entering the films of Japan to some 
degree. What a great tragedy if this 
continues throughout the Japanese 
motion picture industry. 

The motion picture has a responsi- 
bility to teach a moral concept in 
each of its stories. The script writers 
have a moral responsibility to bring 
out the whole part of mankind. The 
newest books on Japanese shelf today 
such as "Sengokei Buke jiten", "Edo 
Sekatsu jiten" and "Nippon Buge Sho- 
den" give the readers the insight into 
the feudal experiences of the people, 
the society and the nation. 

It is this responsibility that the Jap- 
anese critics have been mustering in 
many of their reviews. The film has- a 
responsibility to teach some facet of 
Japanese history to the people. Of 
course, realism has its place in the 
film. There also must be an ethical 



38 



Copyrighted material 



approach to the climax of the story. 
Japan has a proud past during feudal 
times and it is this good that should 
be brought out so that the youth of 
Japan may attach their hopes to a 
solid foundation and be proud that 
they are Japanese. 

The modern, theater audience is 
living near the life and death world 
of true realism. The individual reads 
about such a life and discusses it with 
friends. The medium of the motion pic- 
ture, no matter what the plot of the 
story may convey, must give beneath 
all of the coating a solid theme of the 
loyalty, goodness, the understanding 
that comes from appreciation, the 
humanism of life. The hero should be 
in the form of a symbol which the audi- 
ence can understand and appreciate 
within their own experience. No think- 
ing person really enjoys paying his 
hard earned money for something 
which does not give him something 
in return. The audience doesn't mind 
being fooled on the surface, if there 
is beneath an awareness of the real 
flow of life in the story. In even the 
poorest musical, a weak story of a 
gambler, a sordid samurai story, there 
must always be some line of bushido, 
a way or ethics of life, running through 
the entire film. 

Youth can be impressed with the 
manners, effectively brought out in 
their full manifestation, as a grace or 
a thing of beauty. Manly, yet gentle 
will have a real meaning for the term 
"habitual deportment" which is always 
shouted to children. The action can be 
understood no matter how trite some 
life experience of each character un- 
folds on the screen. 

There is much more to a feudal 
epic film than just the extracting of a 
story from "Go Rin Sho" which has a 
deep philosophy entwined with the 
world of the samurai or the vastness 
of Japanese folklore. There is a black 
and white print of "Satome Hakenden 
No Samurai" which still poaches on 
the fantasy, yet enjoying the very real- 
istic life and death struggle of the 

Eeople. As a film story it has long 
een a source of enjoyment with young 
and old. There is much that can be 
said for the swordsmanship in the 
film. The actors move their hips when 
they cut with the long sword. The 
tsuba (the guard on the hilt of the 
sword) is not choked by the right hand 
as the move is made to draw the 
blade. The fingers are not used to re- 
turn the blade to the "saya" (seaboard] 
after the encounter. There is an air of 
realism in the film, yet it is as if one 
were in the world of "Momotaro San". 




A sword play begin in Shochiku's "Harakiri" . Harakiri is a privilege re- 
served for a samurai to redeem himself through suicide ( sclf-emboirelment). 




Shochiku's Tetsuro Tanba fa holder of 3rd Degree, Sandan, in Kendo) 
stars as a ronin (a masterless samurai). 




Kobayashi, one of the top directors with Shochiku is shown on location. 




Akira Kurosawa, world famous Japa- 
nese director, is shown giving direc- 
tions for the death scene with 
arrows in Toho Productions "The 
Throne of Blood", a Japanese version 
of Shakespeare's "MacBeth". 



It is the life and death philosophy of 
the people that is clearly and dra- 
matically drawn out in the old motion 
picture. A new revision has lost al- 
most all of the tenable features of the 
old film. What a stirring film it would 
have been had the plot of the old 
story which was proven to be a hit, 
been woven into the new which ap- 
peared in color and good sound track. 

One of the most ridiculous changes 
that have roared into the new samurai 
films is the modern jazz or hillbi'ly 
music as background. This is one of 
the most contemptable additions and 
insults on Japanese and western senses. 
Not less than five recent samurai films 
have driven the audience away be- 
cause of the great contrast between a 
chanbara picture and the background 
music — of all things a jazz band! 

With all of the rich classical music 
there is really little need to add jazz 
to a feudal period. Why not develop 
the kote (harp), shakuhachi (flute made 
of bamboo), and the shamisen (three- 
stringed instrument) to go along ith 
the film. How much more value as a 
film bring Japanese culture to the 
youth of Japan than that of a foreign 

40 



nation that has no national music of 
its own? Develop a pride in the his- 
torical feudal times of Japan. There 
is an awe inspiring greatness that can 
be obtained through the materials on 
Japanese historical events. It is the 
moral responsibility of the writers and 
artists of Japan's motion picture in- 
dustry to develop within the conscious- 
ness of Japanese youth the living past, 
a love for things Japanese. As in the 
isolated case of Toshiro Mifune request- 
ing that he be allowed to carry his 
"Shikken" or "live" blade in his samurai 
films. Asked why, he replied, "I feel 
as if I were really alive and in the 
feudal time of the part that I am 
playing in a real life and death strug- 
gle." His remark conveys the deep 



respect that this man has for the 
feudal parts he plays. 

Therefore, it is the responsibilty of 
the Japanese motion picture industry 
to develop films which will teach a 
mora! story to the Japanese public. 
There is no other medium which can 
reach so many people in the world 
with color, the sound, and the realism 
of visual and sense appreciation. The 
greatest educators of the ancient and 
modern world have realized that some 
means would have to be developed to 
teach all of the children the history 
of their own culture in an interesting 
manner. Today, through the innocent 
chanbara films of the life of ancient 

( Continued on page 58) 



Does Meditation Contribute to The Development Of The Hind (KM? 




Master Koichi Tohei (9th degree) demonstrates the 
proper %vay to do meditation in Aikido. 



MEDITA- 
TION IN 
AIKIDO 



All new born babies utilize their abdomens or 
diaphragms for breathing during the first three 
months; automatically convert to rib or chest 
breathing as they mature. No one seems to un- 
derstand the cause or reason for this transition. 
But the followers of Aikido, Zen, and Yoga be- 
lieve that diaphragm's breathing is the proper 
way man should breathe. 

Deep or controlled breathing should not be 
confused with meditation. Deep breathing ex- 
ercise which is getting more and more attention 
in United States as a tonic to tension is not new. 
Singers have been applying it for years. The ex- 
ercise begins by exhaling very slowly through 
your mouth. This exhalation is not like blowing 
a balloon, but instead like clearing your throat. 
Inhalation is through your nose very slowly. The 
passage of the air is through your nose and 
through your throat. You must feel a slight ten- 
sion in your throat as the air is sucked in. There 
is a slight two or three seconds pause after each 

exhalation and inhalation. 
If you are a beginner, do the exercise at a 

count of eight for both exhaling and inhaling. 
As you progress the count can be increased to 
ten, 12, 15, and so forth. In the beginning fifteen 
minutes a day is sufficient. Eventually as you be- 
come accustomed to this method of respiration, 
you can gradually extend your exercises. The 
best posture is sitting, but you can also do it ly- 
ing or standing. Whatever position you select, 
remember to keep your back straight. If you are 
doing it properly, you will notice that only your 
abdomen is moving. 

Meditation, as we practice it today, is normally 
lowering our heads, closing our eyes, and whis- 
pering thanks or forgiveness to the Almighty. In 
Zen meditation is to sit motionless for hours 
with your eyes closed, legs crossed, and your 
mind in deep thought. In case you lose control 
of your thought, you can always depend on im- 
mediate help from the Zen priest. He will tap 
your shoulder gently with a wooden staff . . . 
this action is supposed to aid you to regain your 
thought from wandering. 



41 




Begin the exercise by exhaling slowly through your 
mouth. Keep your back erect and focus your mind on 
the one-point. 



There are various approaches to meditations. 
Each clairvoyant school has its own method of 
practicing them. Some like Yoga and Aikido 
apply profound concentration with controlled 
respiration (as described above). Although both 
seems to utilize the same method, their objectives 
in focusing their thoughts are widely apart. In 
Aikido the thought is always on the one-point 
below the navel (Seika-no-itten). In Yoga the 
focus of concentration varies among the schools. 
One school may emphasize at a point on their 
foreheads; another may be on an image of a dead 
person — in an attempt to make contact; and 
still another, image of a place or person living 
in a remote area. 

In Aikido, as you practice inhaling and exhal- 
ing, your mind or thought must continuously be 

42 




After you have exhaled all the air out. stop for a few 
second before starting on the inhalation. 



centered at the one-point. In the beginning your 
thought will tend to wander. You can help pre- 
vent this by putting slight pressure at the point 
with your thumb. Although you will find it most 
favorable to meditate in a sitting position in an 
empty room, it can also be performed standing 
or walking. 

Meditation calls for hard work and you must 
really self-discipline yourself if you are to suc- 
ceed. Although you can learn to do it yourself, 
you will find it easier and more enjoyable to 
learn it in a group. By self-training you will have 
the tendency to procrastinate and shorten the 
exercise. In group participation this tendency is 
eliminated. A leader can be chosen. Each partici- 
pant follows his command. As he claps his hands, 
everyone exhales; as he claps his hands again, 

Copyrighted material 



Inhalation should be done slowly through the nose. 
Your thought still focusing on the one point. 



Stop for a few seconds after sucking in as much air 
as you could into your diaphragm. Then repeat the 
procedure all over again. 



everyone inhales. Naturally, the claps between 
breathing should be at a count of eight or more. 
As the participants become adapted to this way 
of meditation, the leader can extend his counts 
and prolong the exercises. 

Meditation plays an important role in the de- 
velopment of your mind(ki). One student com- 
mented: "after I had practiced Aikido for six 
months, I started a rigid program of meditation. 
Every evening after dark, I would sit in the back- 
yard and meditate. In the outset for about fifteen 
minutes a day, and as the months passed by, I 
would gradually increase it to twenty, thirty, 
until I was doing it for forty-five minutes. It 
didn't take long before I was able to pit my ki 
against the more experienced Aikidoists." 



"But I encountered one problem", he con- 
tinued. "When I first started on the program, it 
was during the summer so the neighbors thought 
I was out on my lawn to refresh myself. But when 
winter came around, the temperature dropped 
to the low 40's, and I continued meditating only 
in my shorts. It wasn't long before they quit 
speaking to me and thought that I was some kind 
of a nut." 

A word of caution to the ambitious: don't force 
yourself in doing the respiration. Some over- 
zealous Aikidoists learned their lessons the tough 
way. They thought they can increase their power 
rapidly by exhaling vigorously. After a few times 
of this, they inflicted themselves with piles (hem- 
orrhoids). D 

43 



KARATE 

RISING BLOCK (Age-uke) 



Fig. ONE 




Raise your left arm to the height of your 
forehead in front of the body. Remember 
to keep shoulders level at all times. 




Swing the right arm upward keeping it close 
in to the body. Bring the right hand to a po- 
sition about three inches, slightly above and 
in front of your forehead. 




As the right arm is raised with elbow about 
90° to block, lower your left arm and re- 
tract it to the side. 




As the block is made, counter with your left 
hand to your opponent's body or prepare 
for another block. Maintain correct distance 
from your opponent at all times. 



44 




KARATE 



USE OF THE RISING BLOCK (AGE-UKE) 
DURING SPARRING (KUMITE): 



Fig. ONE 

The defender (r) assumes an Open- 
Stance (Hachiji-dachi) in preparation 
for attack. From this posture one 
can change to any stance required 
immediately. The attacker assumes a 
Forward Stance (Zenkutsu-dachi) and 
is ready to attack with a Lunge 
Punch (Oi-zuki). 





Fig. TWO 

As the attacker lunges forward, the 
defender must move one step back; at 
the same time he must apply the 
Rising Block. (The Rising Block techni- 
que has been illustrated in this issue). 

Remember: maintain your balance 
at all times. It is also very important 
to maintain a correct distance 
between yourself and your opponent 
during back step or counterattack. 



Fig. THREE 

The defender counterattacks with a 
Reverse Punch to his opponent's 

plexus. Grabbing the attacker's 
or pushing, the defender can 
throw his opponent off balance. 



A 

GOODWILL 

TOUR 
BY THE 
FENCING 
MASTERS 
OF JAPAN 



Five of Japan's top Kendo masters arrived 
in San Francisco on last September 8th via 
Japan Air Lines for a good-will Kendo exhibi- 
tion tour of the United States and South 
America. The group was sponsored by the 
All-Japan Kendo Federation with headquarters 
in Tokyo. 

The purpose of such tour was to stimulate 
interest in Kendo as well as to publicize the 
forthcoming 1964 Olympic Games which will 
be held in Tokyo this October. 

The leader of the Kendo masters was Yuji 
Oasa of Kyushu. Master Oasa, who is 76 years 
of age and regarded as the pace setter for ths 
younger members of the group, is one of the 
four living 10th Degree (Judan) Kendo masters 
of Japan. His superb demonstration of fenc- 
ing skill and perfect defense techniques won 
him the enthusiastic acclaim and admiration 
of both the participants and spectators. 

Exhibitions of other martial arts were per- 
formed by other members of the group. Taka- 
shi Ozawa, 9th Degree (Kudan), exhibited 
flawless skill in his lai performance (the draw- 
ing and returning of the sword to the scab- 




9S1 



path to respect and humility . . . and the si 
ing of such skill is the key toward better 
derstanding ai\d cooperation among all rr 
kind. *!Nk/'. 





bard). Te'nosuke Masuda, 8th Degree (Hachi- 
dan) demonstrated the Shindo Muso Ryu Jo- 
Jitsu with the assistance of Torao Mori, 8th 
Degree (Hachidan) and technical advisor of 
BLACK BELT. 

Techniques with the staves and poles (Bo- 
jutsu) and other forms of Kendo katas were 
also on the programs. Each match and demon- 
stration not only provided the beginners as 
well as to the spectators in Kendo a better 
insight on this exhilarating sport but they were 
highly educational and stimulating. 

However, it is regrettable that such an out- 
standing cultural program received so little 
publicity or advance notices. It is a pity that 
more persons could not have been present to 
witness these perfectionists as they displayed 
skills unseen outside of Japan. We of the 
BLACK BELT hope that such cultural ex- 
changes will increase in the future for through 
such exchanges spread of the martial arts 
and sports can be realized. 

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 




MASTER NAGITO TOSHIOKA, 7th Degree (Shichidan), Kyoshi. as born 
in Kagawa ken, Shikoku, on July 9, 1914. He graduated from Meiji 
University, Tokyo, where he later returned to become the head coach 
of its Kendo team. In 1956 and 1962 his teams won the All-Japan Uni- 
versity Student's Kendo Federation Championship. Master Toshioka is a 
member to the Staff of All-Japan Kendo Federation. He is the president 
and founder of the Siemon Leather Company in Tokyo. 



47 




MASTER JUJI OASA, 10th Degree (Judan), born in Kumamoto-ken, Kyushu, 
Japan on January 20, 1887, is one of the four living top kendoist in 
Japan. In 1930 he built the Reido Dojo at Matsubara-machi, Saga City, 
Kyushu, Japan. He is a committee member of the All-Japan Kendo Fed- 
eration as well as being the president of the Saga-ken Kendo Federation. 
He is a consultant for one of the largest cosmetics company in Japan. 




MASTER TAKASHI OZAWA. 9th Degree (Kudan), was born in Saitama-ken, 
Honshu, Japan on August 31, 1900. He graduated from the present 
Tokyo University of Education. In 1933 Master Ozawa became a professor 
at the National Police Academy. He is a committee member of All-Japan 
Kendo Federation and also holds the office of the presidency in the 
Saitama Kendo Federation. He also holds a high degree in lai (drawing 
and returning of the sword). 




MASTER TEINOSUKE MASUDA, 8th Degree (Hachidan), Hanshi, was born 
in Tokyo on Feb. 16, 1901. In 1925 the President of the Kodansha Pub- 
lishing Company, Seiji Noma, appointed him as a Kendo teacher of the 
company's dojo. Master Masuda won the Emperor's Match Cup in 1940. 
He is a member of the All-Japan Kendo Federation. An outstanding 
teacher of Kendo kata, bo-jutsu and other forms of the martial arts, he is 
presently the Kendo instructor at the Police Headquarters in Tokyo. 




MASTER TOSH 10 WATANABE, 8th Degree (Hachidan), Kyoshi, was born in 
Fukayasu-gun, Hiroshima, Honshu. He is 51 years of age. As the Executive 
Secretary of the All-Japan Kendo Federation, his schedule takes him all 
over Japan. He is one of the best informed men on Kendo in Japan. 
Master Watanabe graduated from the Tokyo University of Education and 
is constantly making appearances at university Kendo meetings and 
matches to discuss the various techniques, rules, and history of Kendo. 



48 



Copyrighted material 



TOURNAMENTS' 



ITS: 



ALL AMERICAN KARATE TOURNAMENT 

The State Championship for the 3rd All-American Karate Tournament 
was sponsored by the Karate Association of Hawaii on October 27th. The 
meet held in Honolulu had U. S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye as President 
of the tournament with Governor Burns and the Japanese Consulate Gen- 
eral Kenzo Yoshida as advisors. (Pictured above, I to r) Masataka Mori, 
the Chairman of the Tournament and Chief Instructor of Karate Assn. 
of Hawaii; Yasu Uyehara, 1st Degree (Shodan), who won the 1st place in 
Sparring (Kumite); Thomas Morikawa, 1st Degree (Shodan), who captured 
the 1st place in Kata (Form); and Hidetaka Nishiyama, the Chief Judge 
of the Tournament and President of the All-American Karate Federation. 




SECOND ANNUAL NATIONAL COLLEGIATE JUDO CHAMPIONSHIPS, ITHACA, N.Y. 

135-Pound Class: 1st place - Al Okamoto, San Jose State; 2nd - David 
Colon, University of Puerto Rico; 3rd - Lucius Bernard; 
West Point. 

150-Pound Class: 1st place - Lee Parr, San Jose State; 2nd - Hitoshi Ta- 
naka, Columbia University; 3rd - Peter Goldreich, Cor- 
nell. 

165-Pound Class: 1st place - Kay Yamasaki, San Jose State; 2nd - Wil- 
liam Coleman, U.S. Air Force Academy; 3rd - Joe 
Ozaki, Columbia. 

180-Pound Class: 1st place - *Dave Sawyer, San Jose State; 2nd -Tru- 
man Young, U.S. Air Force Academy; 3rd - Eric Hit- 
tinger, Ohio State University. 

195-Pound Class: 1st place - Gary Newquist, San Jose State; 2nd - Al- 
bert Pfeltz, U.S. Air Force Academy; 3rd - Jerry Sar- 
ris, Cornell. 

Unlimited Heavyweight Class: 1st place - Allan Schmidt, Cornell; 2nd- 
Marlowe Ubl, Ohio State University; 3rd - Jim Marko- 
witz, Dartmouth College. 

*Dave Sawyer also took the individual championship. 

Team Standings: 1st place - San Jose State (50 pts), 2nd - Cornell Uni- 
versity (25 pts), 3rd - U.S. Air Force Academy (24 pts), 
4th - Ohio State University (13 pts), 5th - Columbia 
University and West Point (12 pts each), 7th - Univer- 
sity of Puerto Rico (8 pts), 8th - Dartmouth College 
and Cornell College of Agriculture (5 pts each), 1 0th - 
Princeton University. 

JUDO TOURNAMENT OF THE PASADFNA JAPANESE CULTURAL INSTITUTE, PASADENA, CALIF. 

Black Belt Division's winner: R. Mathiase of Sawtelle. 

White and Brown Belt Division: 1st place - S. Motokawa of Sun Valley; 

2nd - F. Kyle of Lakewood Y.; 3rd - H. Sagara of San 

Fernando. 

Shonen Competition: 1st place - M. Kane of Oqden; 2nd - R. Yoshitomi 
of Seinan; 3rd - K. Okada of Orange County; 4th - H. 
Kiyomura of Pasadena; and 5th - H. Sato of Long 
Beach. 

Yonen Competition: 1st place - H. Hashimoto of Pasadena; 2nd - S. Ya- 
suda of East Los Angeles; 3rd - R. Isa of ELA; 4th - G. 
Espinosa of Orange County; 5th - J. Sato of Long 
Beach. 



49 



Cop 



fi Wl 1 1 >HB I ,' / 'M \ \ M : I Wl 1 



WORfH AMERICAN 






Aerial view of one of North American vlv/af/on's 
recreaf/on centers indicates scope of activities made 
available to employees. At center are club house, 
gym, exercise room, auditorium, and swimming 
pool. In background are outdoor play area, tennis 
courts, golf course, and softball diamonds. Center 
covers 20-acre site in Orange County. 



A funny thing is happening to 
the American working man and 
woman on their way home from 
work these days. A good many 
of them are arriving home by 
way of a rather extended detour. 

And the neighborhood pub has 
nothing to do with it. The miss- 
ing men and women are stopping 
in at a company-sponsored recre- 
ation center to take advantage 
of free facilities and instruction 
that would cost them a pretty 
penny elsewhere. 

Included in these facilities are 
a growing number of well- 
equipped gyms which have 



helped, among other things, to 
contribute to the current boom in 
the martial arts. 

At North American Aviation, 
an aerospace firm with headquar- 
ters in the Los Angeles area, no 
less than four recreation centers 
are in use to serve the company's 
employees scattered throughout 
the sprawling Southland. 

Each is equipped with a mod- 
ern gym with exercise, bodybuild- 
ing, and weightlifting gear. And 
they provide a perfect backdrop 
for an excursion into the martial 
arts. 

Judo clubs have been organ- 



ized for both men and women, 
and even children of employees 
are invited to take part. 

The organized company rec- 
reation which has made this pos- 
sible is of relatively recent origin. 
Before the turn of the century, 
there wasn't much need for facili- 
ties to help make profitable use 
of leisure time. There simply 
wasn't enough leisure time to 
worry about. A 12-hour day, nor- 
mally six days a week, left the 
working man with little desire 
for anything more than eating 
and sleeping. 

Times have changed. With the 



50 



coming of the 40-hour work week, 
employees and their families have 
become gradually accustomed to 
a large amount of leisure time. 
Even allowing for such week-to- 
week chores as washing to fam- 
ily car and keeping the lawn 
manicured, a sizeable number of 
evening and week-end hours re- 
main to be used. 
At North American Aviation, 

the organized program to imple- 
ment the philosophy of industrial 
recreation dates back a quarter 
century. Informality was the key- 
note of these beginnings. A few 
employees got together to bowl 
after work, to play Softball on a 
Sunday afternoon. During the 
years that followed, the scope of 
recreational activities in which 
employees and their families took 
part broadened to embrace a 
tremendous variety. 

With the rapid population ex- 
pansion which took place in the 
Los Angeles area following World 
War II, the shortage of commu- 
nity recreation facilities available 
became increasingly apparent. In 
1947, North American inaugu- 
rated a building program which 
is still in progress. At present, 
four separate centers encompass- 
ing approximately 50 acres serve 
the employees of the company's 
Southern California divisions. 

At its plant in Columbus, Ohio 
employees have the use of a 67- 
acre site near the Columbus Mu- 
nicipal Airport. In addition, 37 
acres of land near North Ameri- 
can's Neosho, Missouri, plant 
have been developed for employee 
use. 

North American Aviation's 
recreation program offers to the 
employee and his family an op- 
portunity for enjoyable, satisfy- 
ing, and constructive use of lei- 
sure time. This is the basic 
philosophy of the company's pro- 
gram, and because this is so, it 
is the employees themselves who 
decide what activities should be 
included. 

Planning and operation of most 



Only as a small cog in a gigantic recreational program, 
Judo is causing more than just bumps and thumps 

at this huge areospace center. 




Spectators are amused and amazed at the fast action and agressiveness of the 
contestants during a Judo match. 






activities is handled by those tak- 
ing part. The athletic groups, 
such as bowling, softball, golf, 
and Judo, write their own rules 
of participation. The clubs have 
their own constitutions and by- 
laws and elect officers to govern 
club activities. 

In a sport such as Judo, where 
little if any emphasis is placed 
on size weight, or brute strength, 
it is only natural that participa- 
tion should include youngsters as 
well as adults. 

What is the drawing card? 
Recreation officials look at it this 
way. "Most people come to the 
classes with the sole intention of 
learning self-defense. It doesn't 
take long, however, before they 
become interested in the competi- 
tive aspect of the sport. For chil- 
dren, Judo develops self-confi- 
dence and coordination. Men and 
women look to it for exercise and 
emotional release." 

Compared with golf or tennis, 
the sport requires a relatively 
modest cash outlay. $15 for a 
white cotton Judo suit, a few 
more dollars for instruction books 
and the new Judo buff is in busi- 
ness. From there on out, the 
lumps and bruises which go with 
the sport can be acquired at vir- 
tually no cost at one of the com- 
pany's recreation centers. 

Even the spectator aspects of 
the sport are drawing more and 
more interest. Tournaments held 
by the company's Judo clubs have 
been drawing well, and current 
plans are to hold a lot more of 
them. 

"Once you begin to find out 
what it's all about," a Judo fan 
will tell you, "the sport has a lot 
of suspense and drama. It's hard 
to turn your head away when you 
know that it only takes a split 
second to get thrown on your 
head!" □ 



Tom Owens, 3rd Class (Sankyu) breaks a Shoulder Throw (Seoi-nage) by 
his opponent. Douglas Hall of Luke Tactical AFB referees the match. 



52 





During practice session in the dojo, Asao Kusano demonstrates Stomach Throw (Tamoe-nage) as students watch. 




v 





"Ippon" point is scored with an Thigh Throw (Uchimata) 



During a demonstration at the recent North American 
Judo Tournament held at its Downey Recreation Center, 
Roy Sunada, 1st Degree (Shodan), executes a Shoulder 
Throw (Seoi-nage) for the benefit of the spectators and 
contestants. Victor Takagi, a 1st Degree, takes the fall. 



53 

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MORE LETTERS 

Continued From Page 7 

POLICE REGISTRATION? 

I am one of the subscribers to 
your magazine and find the editorial 
section, in some instances very help- 
ful. There is a question or saying 
that comes up once in awhile that I 
have not been able to find the answer 
to. At least some of the inquiries 
that I have mailed out have remained 
unanswered. The question that needs 
to be answered is this: Does one 
that become proficient in Judo and 
Karate have to register with the 
Police Departments? I think this is 
an undue restraint upon one's free- 
doms unless of course he has a police 
record and the town, city or what- 
have-you requires a registration un- 
der the police powers of the particu- 
lar body involved. 

A prompt answer to the above 
inquire will be greatly appreciated. 

Frank Fullerton, Judo 
Instructor, Texas 
Western College and 
Karate Instructor, 
Ft. Bliss, Texas 



(Yes, ice agree . . . it would be an 
undue restraint upon one's freedom 
if devotees of the martial arts had 
to register. Black belt karateists in 
Japan icere required to register with 
the police in the past; however, such 
practices has become obsolete. In the 
USA, as far as we know, there is 
no regulation on registration. But, 
if one whether he's a karateist or 
not was to assault someone, he would 
be thrown in jail. However, this is 
highly improbable since a good kara- 
teist or judoist would never . . . Ed.) 
# # 

OKAZAKI, A LOMILOMI 

Your magazine has improved im- 
mensely with the current number 
(March-April, 1963) and you are to 
be congratulated upon its improve- 
ment. The language, too, is improved 
and not "Oriental sounding" as in 
previous numbers. 

The article on Prof. Henry S. 
Okazaki was especially enjoyed as 
he was very well known to this 
writer for many years, and Mr. 
Morris, author, is to be commended 
upon the excellent biography. But 
one statement is in error where he 
observed that "Lomilomi" is a "Ha- 
waiian massage using the feet." 



Lomilomi is something like the 
Japanese anma and it utilized not 
only feet (as Mr. Morris would have 
us believe), but also hands, fingers, 
elbows. This writer was trained in 
the feet manipulation by his mother, 
but it was not the only part of the 
anatomy used. In fact, the hands 
were the most important. 

Too, Mr. Morris should have men- 
tioned that Sensei-san (Prof. Oka- 
zaki) wrote a book entitled SELF 
DEFENSE FOR WOMEN AND 
GIRLS in 1929 while he was on 
Maui. I have always hoped that ' a 
complete biography of the Professor 
would be compiled one day and I 
have long kept a file on him. It may 
interest you to know that he treated 
Governor Burns' wife when she be- 
came paralyzed and they, in grati- 
tude, named their son SEISHIRO 
after the Professor. If you will send 
a copy to Gov. John H. Burns, Iolani 
Palace, Honolulu, and point out the 
story by Mr. Morris, I think that 
Governor Burns would appreciate it. 
You can say that it was sent to him 
at my suggestion as he is a friend. 

Sincerely and aloha, 
Charles Kenn 
Honolulu, Hawaii 



54 



c 



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TANG S00 

( Continued from page 33) 

Sheriff Rice was impressed 
with the performance and 
stated that Karate seemed to 
have a great potential in 
police force use. He asked 
that a study be started to 
determine the merit of phas- 
ing Karate instruction in 
with the regular training at 
the Sheriff's Training Center 
in Riverside, California. 

Airman Norris stressed the 
major benefits of this ancient 
art of self-defense. They in- 
clude confidence of ability, 
speed and alertness and co- 
ordination of mind and body. 

The ultimate aim of the 
Karate art, according to the 
American Tang Soo Do, lies 
not in victory or defeat, but 
in the perfection of character 
of the participants. 

Subscribe to 



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Must Accompany Copy. Send all material to Advertising Dept., 
c/o Black Belt, Inc., 1288 S. La Brea, Los Angeles, California. 



AIKIDO 

California Aiki Kai 
8910 Venice Blvd. 
Los Angeles, California 
Head Instr: Isao Takahashi 
838-7557 



JU JITSU 

Wilshire Jiu Jitsu Dojo 
Shidare Yanagi Ryu 
1932 West Seventh Street 
Los Angeles 57, California 
Phone: HU 3-8162 



KARATE 



Kenpo Karate Asc. Of America 
Pres: Ed Parker 
Affiliated Members: 

11179 Santa Monica Blvd. 
W. Los Angeles 25, Calif. 
Phone: GR 8-9123 

7413 Crenshaw Blvd. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Phone: 750-3030 

385 W. 2nd Street 
Pomona, Calif. 
Phone: NA 2-9120 

1713 E. Walnut St. 
Pasadena, Calif. 
Phone: SY 3-2860 

44 East 8th South 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Phone: 328-4572 
Instr.: Mills Crenshaw 

2733 Riverside Blvd. 
Sacramento, California 
Phone: 443-9517 
Instr.: Al Tracy 

1134 Valencia 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Instr.: Ralph Castro 
Bus. Phone: MI 7-1666 
Res. Phone: MA 1-5850 

1422 Ocean Ave. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone: JU 7-9960 
Instr.: Jim Tracy 



Academy of Karate Kung-fu 
5440 Hollywood Blvd. 
Hollywood, Calif. 
Phone: 462-0422 



Chicago Judo and 
Karate Center 
7902 S. Ashland Ave. 
Chicago 20, ILL 
Instrs.: G. Wyka 
and J. Keehan 
TR 3-1243-44 



Canadian Federation of Karate 
An Affiliate of Japan Karate 
Association 

c/o Mr. Ary Anastasiadis 
804 Quimet St. 
Villa St. Laurent 9, P.Q. 
Montreal, Canada 
Phone: RI 7-9345 

Hatashita Karate Dojo 
784l/ 2 Bronson Ave. 
Ottawa, Ontario 

Toronto Karate Dojo 
1778 Jane Street 
Weston, Ontario 

Central Dojo 
1216 Stanley 
Montreal, Quebec 

Gichin Karate Dojo 
57 St. Raymond 
Wrightville, P.Q. 

Hakudokan Karate Dojo 
387 Fairmount 
Montreal, Quebec 

American Karate Foundation 
Director: Jerry Packard 
5977 Venice Blvd. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
WE 6-2272 - WE 5-7740 



55 



mm mi nice of m 



MONTH 



By Dr. Phillip J. Rasch 




Dr. Phillip J. Rasch first became interested in 
Judo while a student at Fuller ton District Junior 
College. He trained at Smeltzer dojo under the 
instruction of Yaju Yamada. After his service as 
a Lt. Commander in the Pacific, Rasch earned 
his Ph.D. in physical education at the University 
of Southern California. 

Dr. Rasch, a Director of the Biokinetics Re- 
search Lab at the California College of Medicine, 
has published numerous articles and books on 
the physiological and psychological aspects of 
exercise. He is a member of the Board of Trustees 
of the American College of Sports Medicine and 
the Research Council of the American Associa- 
tion for Health, Phys. Ed., Recreation. He is the 
Book Review and Abstracts Editor for the Jour- 
nal of the Association for Physical and Mental 
Rehabilitation. 

Donn F. Draeger, whose contributions to 
Strength and Health will be recalled by many 
of our readers, and Masatoshi Nakayama, Chief 
Instructor of the Japan Karate Association, have 
here combined their talents to present a descrip- 
tion of the basic moves of Karate for the man 
without time to practice the more elaborate tech- 
ques set forth in Nishiyama's definitive text. For 
the student trying to learn the elements of the art 
without the aid of an instructor this is probably 
the most practical manual now available. There 
is some question in the reviewer's mind whether 
readers will continue to peruse the several pages 



headed "Essential Points" once they find they 
are identical, but certainly, no one can disagree 
with the effort to re-inforce the importance of 
the fundamentals. 

A particularly good feature is the stress and 
instruction in proper footwork and balance. 
The book is profusely illustrated. 

In spite of the fact it is written for the man 
who has little time available for practice, the 
authors warn that personal combat is a risky 
business best avoided. 

The reader can have confidence in his ability 
to use these techniques only if he has practiced 
them until they have become automatic re- 
sponses. This is a point which is well taken and 
which is usually overlooked by the over-enthusi- 
astic novice. 

Apparently this is the first in a series of four 
booklets on the subject. Receipt of the others in 
due course will be awaited with interest. 




by M. Nohayomo 
6 Donn F. Draeger 



SPECIAL OF THE MONTH 

Martial Arts Supplies Co. is now offering this 
book at a special price for a one time SALE 
only. This price is good from January 15, 1964 
to March 15, 1964. Please use coupon pro- 
vided Regular price $2.95 

Special price $2.45 

FOR HAIL ORDER FORM — SEE PAGES 3, 59 or 66. 



56 




BLACK BELT 

ROUND TABLE 

This section has been reserved for questions submitted by 
our readers. All questions, technical or general, recent or 
historical and pertaining to the martial arts shall be for- 
warded to our responsible and capable technical advisors. 
Their names and our comments shall appear in BLACK BELT. 



From all I have heard and read in 
regard to building up the hands 
and knuckles, would this prevent 
one from writing, playing an instru- 
ment, doing special work, a desk 
job like drafting, etc.? 

A. Thornton, Iowa 

Although development of the hands 
and feet will enhance the effective- 
ness of a practitioner's blow or kick, 
it is not mandatory that they build 
up tremendous callouses. It is not the 
size of callouse that counts but rather 
the inner development of the cal- 
cium or in other body parts the 
hardening of muscle. It is recom- 
mended that sand should be used 
when punching or kicking. The re- 
sults may take longer but will be 
much more lasting. Chinese herbs 
should also be used — a special lini- 
ment used to prevent blood clots. 



My father is 47 years old. He doesn't 
think he should take Karate because 
of his age. I think he should — what 
do you think? 

R. Oscar, Louisiana 

Definitely yes. There are so many 
phases of Karate. Specializing say 
in just learning forms (shadow box- 
ing sequences) should be sufficient 
as a healthful exercise, for coordina- 
tion, increase of reflex, balance, etc. 
The sport aspect (sparring) can be 
eliminated and it would still be 
extremely advantageous. 



What do they mean by "randori" in 
judo and aikido? 

J. Brown, New Jersey 

In judo's "randori" a contestant will 
go against one opponent and as soon 
as he throws that opponent, he'll 
immediately face another and an- 
other until he, himself, is defeated. 
In aikido' s "randori," one person is 
placed in the center of the mat and 
he'll be surrounded by three, four 
or more opponents or attackers. He 
has to defend himself against simul- 
taneous attacks. 




Is there a list of Karate, Aikido and 
Judo schools throughout the North 
American continent where one can 
seek and receive personal instruc- 
tions? 

H. Devlin, Nebraska 
No. To formulate a complete list 
would involve much research. Then 
too, schools often close as fast as they 
open. The magazine hopes to com- 
pile such a list but it can only be a 
partial list kept current by readers 
who presently have schools. There 
is also the problem of weeding out 
those who are authentic and not fly 
by nights — proof of bonifide creden- 
tials is the only alternative we have. 



I am in search of authentic books. I 
unfortunately live in an area that 
does not have capable instructors; 
therefore, my collection of books are 
all that I have to base any kind of 
training on. Can you help me locate 
these books? 

B. Briggs, California 

Yes. We hope to keep a current list 
of authentic books in our magazine. 
We will keep in contact with all 
publishing firms. All new books will 
be listed in our earliest issues. 



Would it be possible to create a pen 
pal column in your magazine? I am 
interested in writing to other stu- 
dents who study and can exchange 
ideas. 

F. Stearns, Tennessee 

// enough interests are shown for a 
pen pal column, we will start one. 



I'm an old-timer in judo and wish 
to learn Aikido but hesitate because 
of the different ways of falling be- 
tween the two arts. I feel that I 
would not be able to convert. 

T. Suzuki, Hawaii 

You will not find it too difficult to 
convert to Aikido's tumbling type 
of falls. Instructors usually find faults 
in beginners' lack of confidence in 
falling, you do not have that prob- 
lem. 



57 



laterial 



BOYS' 
JUDO 



SPORT • DEFENSE 




96 pages 8'/2 x 11" — 171 illustrations — 115 photographs only 51. 50 
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NAME. . . 
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( Continued from page 40) 

Japan, and in the Samurai epics, not 
only is the feudal past given to Jap- 
anese audiences but, to foreign audi- 
ences too. 

The position of Japanese feudal life 
in the minds of the foreigner is truly 
at stake. Either the appreciation and 
understanding, which is so vital to 
both, will be something valued or 
Japan's history will become the laugh- 
ing stock of the entire world, due to 
the spreading of a false impression of 
Japan through the growing interest of 
foreigners in chanbara and samurai 
epics. The Japanese motion picture' 
industry can develop understanding 
and appreciation with the able leader- 
ship of directors Kurosawa of Toho, 
Kobayashi of Shochiku and many oth- 
ers who are beginning to develop 
realism with fine historical settings and 
with the excellent technical understand- 
ing supported with historical research 
which make some Japanese films world 
award winners! 

This scholarly approach is desper- 
ately needed at this time. If something 
is not promptly undertaken, by all 
members of the Japanese motion pic- 
ture industry, the feudal life of Japan 
will be misunderstood, despised, and 
totally rejected by the foreigner," not 
to forget the paramount person for 
whom the flim is made . . . the Jap- 
anese youth. 

We foreigners are expecting more 
of a Japanese flavor when we see a 
Japanese chanbara, or a samurai epic. 
There are more and more blue eyed 
kenshi who are unfortunately beginning 
to laugh at the mere suggestion of 
the term BUSHIDO. There are also 
those foreigners who have deve'oped 
a fixed impression of Japanese feudal 
life due to only one visit to a chanbara 
motion picture. 

The time is current to do something 
to build a better understanding of 
Japan's feudal life and the very phi- 
losophy of contemporary Japan. There- 
fore, to those who are sincerely inter- 
ested and wish to build a justifiable 
international appreciation and under- 
standing for Japan, I extend my hand 
in deep and humble appreciation. To 
those who look only to the material 
side of life I extend to them my "Hata- 
shijo" (a letter of challenge) — just 
name the place, the temple, the time 
and bring your second. Oh yes, please 
do not forget an obento (box lunch)! 
We have much to discuss. i j 



58 



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THE EIGHTEEN 

MARTIAL 
ARTS OF JAPAN 




by Dr. Gordan Warner 




The development of the martial arts was closely 
linked to the needs of the Samurai for weapons 
of defense or attack. When need of such weapons 
ceased to exist and the Samurai faded into ob- 
scurity, his character training continued as a 
philosophy. 



As we delve into the history of the past, we 
can uncover hidden wealth of materials. But still, 
much remains hidden, untranslated, decaying in 
some musty bookcase. 

We have learned to accept much of the customs, 
rules and beliefs without questioning. Many of 
these have been handed down from cultures con- 
tradictory to ours. The needs and conditions in 
the past may have differed drastically from the 
present; however, they were instrumental in the 
birth and development of many ideas. This also 
applies to that of the martial arts. 

Across the land different methods of warfare 
or combat with its specific weapon of death 
developed, each according to the needs and con- 
dition of its participants. In Japan the develop- 
ment of the martial arts is closely linked to 
that of emergence and passing of the samurai, 
the knight-warrior of Japan. To study the Japa- 
nese martial arts, we must study the samuari.. 

These warriors, steeped in tradition of the 
"bushido" (a code of ethics of the samurai), have 
blazed a well-beaten path crowded with deeds 
and heroics. Many were instrumental in shaping 
the destiny of Japan. 

The period between Yoritomo Minamoto 
(1147-1199 A.D.) and the restoration of the 
Imperial power (1867 A.D.) is regarded as the 
golden era of the samurai. They retained their 
authority with a long and a short sword tucked 
securely in their belt (obi). The sword symbol- 
ized absolute power and authority. However, the 
sword also exemplified the "tamashii" or the 
spirit of those who wore such a weapon. 

One of the most recent books on famous Japa- 
nese swords is Nihon Meito Monogatari (Out- 
standing Japanese Swords) written by Kazan 
Sato. The author, a director of the Swords Sec- 
tion at the National Museum of Tokyo, states 
that words or mottos such as "mi kara deta sabi" 
(an ill life and an ill end), "soriga awanu" (being 
unable to get along with other), "origami tsuki" 
(approved) and many others were inscribed upon 
the sword by the Japanese samurai. Such mottos 
or words still persist today. 

The Stvord and its Master. With the swords and emer- 
gence of the samurai, other martial arts developed. 



("Hamkiri" by Shochiku) 



Thus it is not difficult to imagine that the sa- 
murai considered themselves the protectors of 
the country in service to their lord and that they 
bore the full responsibility of quelling distur- 
bances and restoring peace. It was important 
that they undergo extensive training throughout 
their life. Loyalty, patience, and the mastery 
of the martial arts were essential. However, this 
does not imply that every samurai mastered all 
of the eighteen arts; most reached a mastery in 
many. 

The eighteen martial arts to be discussed in 
this and subsequent issues are as follows: 

1. Ba-Jutsu: The art of horsemanship 

2. Batto-Jutsu: Art of drawing the sword 

3. Bo-Jutsu: Art of using the 4'2" wooden 

staff 

4. Fukumibari- 

Jutsu: Art of blowing needles 

5. Ho-Jutsu: Art of gunnery 

6. Ju-jutsu: Unarmed self defense 

7. Jutte-Jutsu: Protection against sword at- 

tack with a police stick 

8. Ken-Jutsu: The art of fencing 

9. Kusarigama- Iron chain and short curved 
Jutsu: blade technique 

10. Kyu- Jutsu: Archery 

11. Mojiri- Jutsu: Art of entanglement 

12. Naginata- Long Halberd 
Jutsu: 

13. Shinobi- Nin-jutsu, the Art of stealth 
Jutsu: 

14. Shuriken- Throwing of Daggers 
Jutsu: 

15. So-Jutsu: The long spear 

16. Suiei- Jutsu: The Art of swimming with 

an armor 

17. Tanto-Jutsu: Use of the dagger 

18. Torite- Jutsu: Art of Roping 

One of the martial arts which is considered 
to be one of the oldest is Suiei- Jutsu, the art of 
swimming. Even in records dating back to the 
ancient times, many myths on this particular 
martial art are found. Swimming became an es- 
sential part of the military arts and was adapted 
for warfare in the rivers, seas and lakes. Swim- 
ming was a natural art for the island-bound Ja- 
panese. 

During the Tokugawa period ( 1 603- 1 867 A.D. ) 



the technique of swimming was highly developed. 
The Mukai Ryu and the Shinden Ryu were styles 
developed to master the strong river currents. 
Whereas, the Kwankai Ryu was principally 
adapted for open sea. In this art the circular 
movement of the legs (makiashi) was basically 
the principal technique. The upper part of the 
body could be held above the water by strong 
leg drive. This style of swimming allowed the 
samurai to swim with his armor or to fire a gun 
from this position while treading in the water. 

The Kobu Ryu, Takeda Ryu, and the Usuki 
Ryu were developed in Kyushu. Sasanuma Ryu, 
which stressed the method for swimming in 
lakes, was also developed in the southern island. 

As always there was a great rivalry among 
the different schools. In order to stimulate and 
develop such competition, a swimming meet 
was held before the Shogun Iyesada Tokugawa 
in 1810. Twenty-five top swimmers from each 
school competed for three days in various styles 
of swimming. 

One of the most difficult arts to perform in the 
water is the Suikyu-Reisha as developed by 
Suifu Ryu. This style still exists today. The 
archer will take his bow and two arrows and 
swim to a position quite far from shore. Then, 
the archer must draw and shoot both arrows 
at a target. It must be remembered that the 
feathers of the arrows must be dry for a perfect 
flight. The body must be held steady and even 
drawing a bow with both feet on solid ground is 
difficult enough, let alone swimming in deep 
water. 

One of the most colorful demonstrations of the 
ancient art of swimming was performed by the 
Yamanouchi Ryu; this is called the Reiki and 
the Ohbata-Okiwatari. When need arose where 
the banner of a clan was required to be carried 
through water, the swimmers were given long 
poles with banners attached to a small yard-arm. 
He swam using powerful leg drive to carry the 
colors to the enemy. 

Although the martial arts of spear (So-jutsu) 
and long halberd (Naginata-jutsu) may appear 
to be less exciting, there is no doubt about their 
usefulness during the feudal time. One of the 
earliest Japanese spears, which is preserved to- 
day, dates back to the time of Emperor Shomu 



62 



Copyrighted material 



(724-749 A.D.). Various types of blades were 
used for the spears; however, records shows that 
spears proved unsatisfactory in battles and in 
some duels. 

During the Kamakura period (1192-1336 
A.D.) a need for defense and attack against the 
swordsmen resulted in development of formi- 
dable Naginata schools. This weapon was ex- 
tensively used, especially unmounted and in- 
doors. There is some reason to believe that the 
15-foot pole was the favorite weapon of Lord 
Yoshitsune Minamoto's most faithful vassel, 
Benkei. The long curved blade at the end of the 
pole made the weapon feared. It is believed that 
the introduction of protective armor for the legs 
and at the base of the chest armor resulted from 
the development of the Naginata as a fighting 
weapon. 

Because of its length and its fearsome power, 
Naginata was used to arm the women guarding 
the household. A woman of the samurai class 
trained with a Naginata as her weapon could 
hold off an attack by a swordsman. Even today, 
a woman trained with a Naginata can generally 
defeat a good kendoist. A man armed with the 15 
foot pole is the fastest of all martial art fighters, 
(to be continued in the next issue) 




A fight between a swordsman and a samurai with a 
spear. A warrior skilled with a spear was more than 
a match for a stvordsman. 




A battle of the spear-lances. Spears were generally 
carried by foot soldiers; all parts of the spear was 
used as a weapon. CToho: "The Hidden Fortress") 




A naginata (long halberd) is wield by the woman to 
flush an intruder. Women of the samurai class were 
skilled and trained in the use of naginata to protect 
the household during absence of the men. 

Kobori Ryu, "Katchu-Gozen-Oyogi" : a demonstration 
of a samurai swimming while fully clad in a helmet 
and armor. 




Mukai Ryu "Sensu Morogaeshi" : This swimming art 
teas developed to master strong river currents. 



63 



■JJLm. -M— d± ™ JL^ • (Continued from page 13) 

(tsuka). The tsuka is held three inches from the 
lower edge of the chest armor (do). 

The point of the shinai (Sakigawa) is always 
held pointed at the throat protector (tsuki) of the 
opponent when Chudanno Kamae stance is as- 
sumed. The position of the throat protector is al- 
ways the center line of the opponent; therefore, 
the tip of the shinai should follow this point. 

The Gedan no Kamae is similar; however, the 
shinai is lowered. The left foot is always back ; the 
heel about two and one-half inches off the floor. 

The hips must be kept level, the shoulders drawn 
back, and the arms must be relaxed. There are 
many stances. The Left Stance (Hidari Jodan) is 
assumed with the left foot leading and the shinai 
fully above the shoulders. The Right Stance (Migi 
Jodan) is the reverse; the right food must lead. 

There are two types of Kendo matches : the one 
point or two-out-of-three points match. Each match 
last five minutes. A tie results in an additional five 
minutes or the first blow or point scored in the 
overtime period wins the match. 



There is no black belt as such in Kendo. The 
beginner's ranks range from 10th to 1st Class 
(Kyu) ; whereas, the advance students or instruc- 
tors are awarded ranks ranging from 1st Degree 
(Shodan) to 10th Degree (Judan). The highest 
degree, 10th Degree, is reserved for active mem- 
bers of the art; there are only four living 10th 
degree (Judan) holders in the world. 

Kendo is one of the most fascinating arts in the 
world since age, height, weight, sex, or physical 
condition have little bearing on heights to which a 
kendoist can advance. Ho can develop specific skills 
and techniques within pattern of set movements. 
He can build his own character and attitude at a 
pace compatible with his daily schedule. The train- 
ing and patience is for him to choose and follow. 

Kendo is a mental as well as phyical activity. 
The study and discipline take years to develop. It 
is often said that if one will but study a full year 
he will follow Kendo as an active member of a 
fencing school for many years to come. And, like 
the samurai of the bygone days, the kendoists are 
working for the future of his country today and 
for a better tomorrow through an ancient art which 
has become a modern sport . . . Kendo. 



THE TECHNIQUES OF 

KARATE 

Now available in the United States, authentic Karate technique 
movies made under the supervision of the Japan Karate Associa- 
tion. These instruction films are invaluable for all serious students 
of Karate. Films are 8mm black and white. 

Approximately 2y 2 hours of viewing on six separate reels. 



SERIES 1 Various techniques of 
hands and legs. Calisthen- 
ics and training methods. 

SERIES 2 Techniques of thrusting, 
striking and kicking. 

SERIES 3 Techniques of blocking — 
How to perform Heian 
Form No. 1 • Heian Form 
No. 2 • Heian Form No. 3 
• Heian Form No. 4 • 
Heian Form No. 5. 



SERIES 4 How to perform the Tekki 
Form No. 1 • Tekki Form 
No. 2 • Tekki Form No. 3 • 
Empi • Jutte • Chinte • 
Jion. 

SERIES 5 Intermediate forms Bassai 
Dai • Bassai Sho • Gan- 
kaku • Hangetsu. 

SERIES 6 Advanced forms Kanku Dai 
• Kanku Sho • Nijushiho • 
Sochin • Unsu. 




Each Series . 



$15.00 



Complete Set of 6 Series 



$80.00 



Produced By Global Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan and distributed in The United States 
exclusively by the ALL AMERICA KARATE FEDERATION, An Affiliate of Japan 
Karate Association. 




Also available — KARATE SEMINAR in 16mm black and white sound, 
approx. 2000 ft. Write for literature and prices. 



2 reels 



HIDETAKA NISHIYAMA 

CHIEF INSTRUCTOR 



ALL AMERICA KARATE FEDERATION 

An Affiliate of Japan Karate Association 
1440 WEST OLYMPIC BLVD., LOS ANGELES 15, CALIF. • Phone 747-1774 



64 






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JUDO SUITS 

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(TEEN) 


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ADD ON TO YOUR FAVORITE COAT OR JACKET • 100% GUARANTEED 
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AND ORIENTAL ORANGE WORDINGS • FULL 3" DIAMETER • 

Judo Emblem Catalog No. JE3 $1.00 ea. 

Karate Emblem Catalog No. KE3 
•FOR SPECIAL CLUB EMBLEM— PLEASE SEND IN YOUR REQUEST 
AND SIZE REQUIRED • 





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Judo Pennant Catalog No. JP927 . 
Karate Pennant Catalog No. KP927 



.$1.00 ea. 



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HSK BRAND JUDO SUirs 




■ KODOKAN RECOMMENDED ■ 100% COTTON 
■ HEAVYWEIGHT- DOUBLE WEAVE 

The HSK Brand Judo Suit is unsurpassed tor quality The 
choice ol champions throughout the world, these heavy duty 
judo suits are double weave 100% US cotton reinforced at 
the neck, shoulders, armpits, collar, chest and knees Regula 
tion AA.U. and Olympic tournament weight and specifications 
Each set includes lacket, pants and while belt 



row 



109 


No. B -6 years old and under. 


J10.50 


100 


No. A- 7 to 9 year old youngster 


1125 


101 


No 1-9 to 12 year old teenager. 


1125 


102 


No. 2-Small (125 lbs a.eraie) 


UJO 


103 


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16.75 


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IMS 


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MOO 


CHAMPION BRAND JUDO SUITS 



KODOKAN RECOMMENDED ■ BUDGET PRICES 
■ SUMMER WEIGHT— SINGLE WEAVE 

Styled and manufactured by HSK.. the Champion brand judo 
jacket is 65% rayon and 35% cotton Pants and belt are 
100% cotlon. Each set includes jacket, pants and white belt 



Cjl N« S.j. 


Price 


201 No 1-Jumor (Under 110 lbs) 


S 9 25 


202 No. 2-Small (125 lbs. average) 


11.00 


203 No. 3-Nedium ( 160 lbs average) 


12.00 


204 No 4-Large (190 lbs average) 


13.00 


205 No 5-Citra Large (Over 190 lbs ) 


14.00 




I HSK BRAND JUDO PANTS 


■ 100% COTTON ■ QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 


Quality construction. 100% cotton, doubly reinforced at the 


knees and all edges are hemmed and double stitched for 


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rnu 


301 No 1-Junior (Under 110 lbs) 


S 2.10 


302 No 2-Small (125 lbs average) 


2.50 


303 No 3-Medium (160 lbs average) 


2 80 


304 No 4-Large (190 lbs average) 


3.20 


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350 




JUDO & KARATE BELTS 


Available in white, yellow, purple, green, brown and black 


Please remember to specify color and sue 




>U- Ha. 1 No 2 Na. J No. 4 


No S 


luflw im*H Mo««M Urjt 


iria 


Length 79' 88' 94" 98' 


104' 


Cat. No Ml 502 503 5W 


505 


Price $1.50 $1.60 1 1.75 $200 


12.25 




LADIES" JUDO BELTS 


Ladies' belts are only available in purple, green. 


rown and 


black in three sires All belts have white stripe r 


nmng the 


length ol the belt 




lira Ho Z - Small N*.J.Ht6iMn Na. 4-Urft 


Length 8!" 94' 


9b" 


Cat No 602 603 


604 


Price 12.15 12.30 


S2.S0 




[ KODOKAN RANK PATCHES 



• BLACK BELT RANKS ONLY 
• OFFICIAL KODOKAN SILK EMBLEMS 

Official Kodokan silk rank patches 2* i 2^' can be easily 
sewn on your belt and lapel band ot your judo jacket Available 
for lirst degree to seventh degree Black Belt ranks 



in in id (4> is) <s) 



(7) 



Cat No 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 



JUDO TROPHY FIGURES 



Custom made especially lor our judo customers, these two judo 
trophy figures will fit any standard trophy base Sculptured in 
Japan they may be adapted to desk sets, clocks, ash trays, etc 
to make an ideal gilt or award for the iudo enthusiast 



Cat No JTI Seoinage-4" tall 
Cat No IT2 Osologari-4" tall 
Cat No ITS Se»na|t-3~ tall 



Price 54 PC 
Price 14.00 
Price: 11.S0 



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■ STURDY 100% COTTON 
■ AVAILABLE IN BLUE AND WHITE 
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A superior quality karate uniform is essential to perform and 
practice food karate form Designed and manufactured of 
100% cotlon these suits are extremely durable. Set includes 
jacket, pants and white belt Please specify white or dark blue 

suits 



Cat tea. Sill 


Whrti llu* 


901 No 1 -tumor 


15.50 ax 


902 No 2-Small 


650 720 


903 No 3 -Medium 


7 00 8 20 


904 No 4-Large 


MO 920 


905 No 5-Eitra Large 


9.00 10.20 


JUDO TEX RUBBER MATS | 



■ SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR JUDO 
■ RESILIENT- ECONOMICAL 
• 3 FEET BY 3 FEET BY ONE INCH 

We proudly announce the availability of a new rubber mat de- 
signed and manulactured in (he U S specifically lor the sport 
ol ...do At less than half the price of other types of rubber 
mats and more economical than the traditional latami mat, 
Judo Tei is convenient to slack and store, easy to transport, 
durable and. most important, safe Judo Tei is a closed cell 
rubber product available on one square yard mats that are ex- 
ceptionally resilient on either wooden or concrete floors A 
canvas tarp n ill you need to complete your practice area in 
your gym, school or home Prompt shipment. Two mats are 
equivalent to one judo tatami. 

Cat No 950 Judo Tex $11.00 per mat (1 so. yd ) 

ft,tm f 0 ■ Sm fmtm* 



JUDO TATAMI MATS 



■ KODOKAN REGULATION MATS ■ IMPORTED 
■ RICE STRAW CONSTRUCTION 

Authentic judo mats imported lor the sport of judo Hand made 
by craftsmen of the Orient Available in plain surface or plastic 
covered All tatamis are 3 leet by 6 feel by \ inches thick 
Cat No 700 Plain Rice Straw Judo Tatami Mat 124.00 per mat 
Cat No 777 Plastic Covered Judo Tatami Mat 127.00 per mat 

P»CM » 0 I. lata f'lM.MO 



JUDO NOREN CURTAIN 



Noren curtains from Old Japan with a judo design Traditional 
noren "goodwill" curtains have hung over doors of Japanese 
shops lor centuries. Dress up your den, dojo or oflice wild this 
sign of welcome and hospitality. 

Cat No CBL Price: SIM 



JUDO CLUB EMBLEMS 



Our quality emblems are made to your specifications as to 
design, colors, sin and lettering Send us a sample drawing 
of your club emblem and we will make an actual sample lor 
you A deposit of $500 is required for each sample requested 
which will be credited toward the placement of an emblem 
order 



OFFICIAL KODOKAN 
ACCESSORIES JUDO JEWELRY 



Ltvit KovSoUn lap*! Pin 
Official £mol«m 
Cat No KL-1 $ .40* 



KodoUn Culf Links 
OrfNial EmMom 
Cat No KC A sr so* 



Sm.ll Kodokan Lip.l Pin 
St«- !ni SUvar 
Cat. No K 1 2.M* 



i r» ci<» 

V/i" lio -j with trniblom 
Cat. No. KT B {US' 



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F - fit Quality 
Cat No KB H $2.25 



Kodokan Kef Chain 
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Cat No. KK C SI JO 



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Cal No IBE V 00 



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I 1 ' : ' ttr with jwdofifura 
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on l%- bar 
Cat No fTA %IM 



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Match with KTE lit clip 
Cat No KCB V W 



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two judo Hguin 
Cat No IMC $|.7S 



a , | - ■ BltCklO 
- r. r' jlidO fifltrtS 

Cat No. X F $2.00 



BliM tnamol with enblem 
Cat. No kb M U oo 



KodoJun Bola Tif 
Otticial tin hi am dasitn 
Cat. No XT SI JS» 



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Top quality 
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Judo T • crip 
1 " in- judo fifUTf 
Col No. /TO $1.00* 



judo fiauro 
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Cat No. KTE tSJT 



Cat No JMK 



Judo Medal 
Squart modal with 

tudO fifU'tl 

Cat. No. JMS 



JUDO 1 IBRARY 



KODOKAN JUDO - > GUIDE TO PROFICIENCY 

New Publication by (tie Kodokan Judo Institute 

Cat. No 10 W Price $3.50 

THE COMPLETE SEVEN MTU Of JUDO 

ByM KaaaisJti. 7th Dan 

Cat. No 10 H Price $3.95 

KODOKAN JUDO Br Hikoshi Aida. 8t)i Dan 

Cat No 10 J Price $J« 

JUDO ON THE CMUNO By E. i. Harrison. 4th Dan 

Cat. No. 10 L Price $3J5 

JUDO COMBINATION TECHNIQUES By T. Kaoamura. 7th Dan 
Cat. No 10 M Price $2J5 

JUNIOR JUDO By E J Harrison. 4th Dan 

Cat. No 10 N Price SI SO 

JUOO THROWS AND COUNTERS By Eric Dominy 

Cat No 10 0 Price 12.95 

SCIENTIFIC UNARMED COMBAT By R. A Vairamutlu 

Cat. No 10 P Price $2.»5 



JUDO WITH AIKIDO By Kenji Tomiki. 7th Dan 
Cat No 10 Q 



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*lo% T« MBJ k. ...^ 



A GUIDE TO JUDO GRAPPLING TECHNIQUES By Dr. T Otiashi 

Cat No 10 R Price $2.50 

MT STUDY OT IUDO By G Koizumi. 7th Dan 

Cat. No. 7 A Price $4J5 

THE MECHANICS OF IUDO By Robert Blanchard 

Cat. No. 7 C Pnce $3.7! 

JUOO: BEGINNER TO BLACK BELT By Eric Dominy 

Cal. No. 7 H Pnce CM 

CONTEST JUDO By Charles Verkm 

Cat. No 7 N Price $4.55 

BOYS' JUDO By Harold E. Sharp 

Cat. No. 71 Price (1.50 

MANUAL OF JUDO By E. J. Harrison 

Cat- No. 10 K Price 8.50 

MY METHOD Of JUDO By M Ka»aishi 

Cat No. 7 0 Price S3.S5 

MY METHOD OF SELF DEFENCE By M KJMM 

Cat No 7 P Price $3.95 

THE HANDBOOK Of JUDO By Gene Le Bell ( L C Cou|hran 

Cat. No 10 S Price $3.H 

JU JITSU SElf OEfENSE FOR TEEN AGERS By Robert Uchello 

Cat No 7-R Price $3JS 

POLICE JU JITSU By James Moynahan. Jr. 

Cat No 7 S Price $4.50 



■ SELECTED BOOKS THAT ARC AUTHOPITATIVf 
■ COMPREHENSIVE ■ILLUSTRATED 



HIM 

ILLUSTRATED kOttttAJI SUM 
CANON OF RIM 
m SPORT Of «M 
TKt TtCMNIQUO OF JVM 
THE SiCtETS OF JUOO 

... . edtioa: 



Cat No 10S 
Cat No IO C 
Cal Na 10 C 
Cal Na 10 A 
Cat Na. 10 0 
Cat Na. 10-0 
Cat Na. 100P. 



Price IIS.M 
Price: SI! 00 
Prica: SI MB 
Price: SJ CO 
Prica KM 
Price: H.7I 
Price ti n 



contest judo 10 racism meows ci n. t k ma. ss no 

JUDO TTUININS METHODS Cat. No 71 Price: SS SO 

■HAT II IUDO ' Cal. No 10F Prica: SI rc 

A COMPini GUIDE TO iUDO Cal No IO C Price ss.es 

THE FWKTINC SPIRIT Of JAPAN Cat No 7 N Pike: IS Do 

OfflCLAl A A u JUM HUD4KSOK Cat. No. 10 U Prka: MM 



PAPERBACK EDITIONS 



THE MANUAL OF JUDO By E. J. Harrison 




Cal No 7 CP 


P- re $.1 00 


JUDO By Eric Dominy 




Cat. No 7 BP 


Price $140 


JUDO FOR GIRLS By E J. Harrison 




Cat. No. 7 QP 


Price i 1.00 


SECRETS Of JUDO By Watanabe ( Aaakian 




Cat. No. 10 DP 


Price Si n 



We are extremely {fateful to all our friends and customers for 
the loyalty and patronage eitertded to Judo International. 
It is no secret that quality merchandise and service has been 
the key to our success We appreciate your confidence in us and 
trust it will merit your continued patronace and recommend) 
tnns to your friends 



KARATF BOOKS 



THE WAY OF KARATE By Georfe E. Mattson 
Cat. No KB i 

THE MANUAL OF KARATE By E I Harrison 
Cal. No 7 E 



Price $5.50 



Price $4J» 

KARATE: THE OPEN HAND AND FOOT FIGHTING - VOL 1 

By Bruce Tegner 
Cat Hi. 02 Price $155 

KARATE - VOL 2 By Bruce Teener 
Cat. No. KB 7 Price $1J5 

BRUCE TEGNER'S COMPLETE BOOK Of SELF-DEFENCE 

By Bruce Teener 
CatNo.KBlO Price $5J5 

URATE IS MY LIFE By Robert A Trias 
Cat No KB 11 Price $IM 

THE ART Of -EMPTY HAND" FIGHTING By Hrdetaka Nishryama 

and Richard Broam 
Cat. No. KB I Price: $7 JO 

KENPO KAJtKTE By Edmond Palter 

Cat. No. KB 6 Price: $10) 

KARATE BY PICTURES By H. D. Plee 

Cat No KB 9 Price: $3.95 



KARATE JEWELRY 



KARATE BELT BUCKIE - Front near ol closed fist 
Cat No KBB Price $2.25 

KARATE TIE CUP- Front «ie« ol closed list 
Cat. No KAT Price $li»* 

KARATE KETCHAIN-Apracticalfift. 
Cat. No KAK 



AIKIDO BOOKS 



AIKIDO By Master Tohei 
Cat No. 7 0 

what IS AIKIDO? By Master Tohei 
Cat No. 7 R 

JUDO WITH AIKIDO By Kenji Tomiki 
Cat No 10 Q 



Price $li5 

Price $SJ0 
Price $2.95 
Price S100 



SELF DEFENSE ACCESSORIES 



KENDO SHINAI - Bamboo practice swords (46 inches) 

Cat No HAS Price $5 00 

POLICE STICKS- Bamboo sell delense batons (24 inches) 

Cat No KAP Price $2-50 

KENDO BOKUTO - White Oak kendo snord (39 inches) 

Cal No KAB Price $3J0 

SHORT BOKUTO - White Oak kendo daEier ( 1 2 inches) 

Cat No KAD Ptice$lJS 

^H*^^ - THE ORIGINAL JUDO BAG 
• IDEAL GIR > USEFUL AND PRACTICAL 

Deuced eidusnely for iudo. the Gi Sk hti been one ol ttw 
most popular items featured by Judo International. It n made 
of heavy duty, durable black plastic with reinlorced corners. 
The handle is secured by double rivets, the upper openmi is 
eitra l«rfe An outside pocket conveniently holds slippers or 
a damp towel 

Cat No JB? Small Gi Sac frict U OC* 

Cat. No. JB1 Uric Gi Sac Price HM* 

Cat. No JBO Ei L| Gi Sac Pnce 15.00* 

M8% fiaiWoit tMf Tea aeaaje»l tj> as^djetat 



HOW TO ORDER 

1. Print or type name and address clearly. 

2. State catjiojjut number, quantity, description, size, 
color and unit price. 

3. All tewetry items and judo bap with asterisk must 
include 10% Federal eicise tax 

4 California residents add 4% state sales tai. 

1 C O 0. orders must be acampanied with 50% ol 

purchase. C O D. fees and postaie mil be included. 
& All orders less than f>S 00 must include S0< urvicc 

and hamllifl| charp. 
7. Ilamt not in ttoca will bt back ord« rtd and shipped 

promptly when available, unless otherwise specified 
in your order. 

I. Air Mail orders will be shipped only if sufficient 

postafe is included witti the order. 
9. Prices subject to chan|e without notice. 
10. Hake checks payable to iudo International 



JUDO INTERNATIONAL 
1090 SANSOME-SAN FRANCISCO 



JUDO 
INTERNATIONAL 




SCROLLS FOR HOME OR DOJO 

Specially made scrolls to decorate the walls of homes or dojos 
is now in the works and will be available soon! The scroll will 
be in Japanese characters for JUDO. KARATE, AIKIDO. KENDO 
AND JU-JITSU. Available in black and white only. Please 
inquire for prices, etc. The approximate, available date will 
be in January of 1964. 



BLACK BELT 

1288 So. La Brea 

Los Angeles 19, California. 



BLACK BELT COVER PHOTO 

With the consent of the participants and Black Belt Magazine, 
Martial Arts Supplies Co. is now offering these photographs in 
(full color) for the devotees of the Arts. The approximate size 
is 8'/ 2 " x 11" $1.95 ea. 



FOR MAIL ORDER FORM — SEE PAGES 3, 59 or 6 

MARTIAL 




SUPPLIES CO. 

P.O. Box 8176 Los Angeles, California 

90008